每日一词:seder(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for April 9, 2020 is:

seder • \SAY-der\  • noun

: a Jewish home or community service including a ceremonial dinner held on the first or first and second evenings of the Passover in commemoration of the exodus from Egypt

Examples:

Ari enjoys the stories, songs, and rituals that accompany dinner on the night of the seder.

“In the private classes, the group will get to choose among three menus for their lesson. The first includes seder dishes such as tri-colored matzo ball soup, tomato leek California beef roast, … date-honey roasted vegetables and chocolate souffles.” — Rebecca King, NorthJersey.com, 17 Feb. 2020

Did you know?

Order and ritual are very important in the seder—so important that they are even reflected in its name: the English word seder is a transliteration of a Hebrew word (sēdher) that means “order.” The courses in the meal, as well as blessings, prayers, stories, and songs, are recorded in the Haggadah, a book that lays out the order of the Passover feast and recounts the story of the Exodus. Each food consumed as part of the seder recalls an aspect of the Exodus. For instance, matzo (unleavened bread) represents the haste with which the Israelites fled ancient Egypt; maror (a mix of bitter herbs) recalls the bitterness of life as a slave; and a mixture of fruits and nuts called haroseth (or haroset/haroses or charoseth/charoset/charoses) symbolizes the clay or mortar the Israelites worked with as slaves.


Lake桑

April 09, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:berserk(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for April 8, 2020 is:

berserk • \ber-SERK\  • adjective

: frenzied, crazed — usually used in the phrase go berserk

Examples:

The dog inevitably goes berserk whenever he hears the doorbell.

“It was the first costume exhibit I had ever seen in my life. I didn’t know such a thing even existed. And I was so excited and I went berserk…. So much of what was in the exhibit, I already owned.” — Sandy Schreier, quoted in The Washington Post, 13 Nov. 2019

Did you know?

Berserk comes from Old Norse berserkr, which combines ber- (“bear”) and serkr (“shirt”). According to Norse legend, berserkrs were warriors who wore bearskin coverings and worked themselves into such frenzies during combat that they became immune to the effects of steel and fire. Berserk was borrowed into English (first as a noun and later as an adjective) in the 19th century, when interest in Scandinavian myth and history was high. It was considered a slang term at first, but it has since gained broader acceptance.


Lake桑

April 08, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:maverick(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for April 7, 2020 is:

maverick • \MAV-rik\  • noun

1 : an unbranded range animal; especially : a motherless calf
2 : an independent individual who does not go along with a group or party

Examples:

“‘My record company wanted more of “The River & The Thread” but I couldn’t do it,’ she said. ‘It seemed false. So I went in another direction.’ It’s not surprising for [Rosanne] Cash, who has been a maverick during her lengthy career, to go another way.” — Ed Condran, The Gazette (Cedar Rapids, Iowa), 6 Feb. 2020

Audubon, a naturalist, artist, hunter, showman, and conservationist, was a maverick in his day, and his legacy has come to mean the very heart of bird conservation.” — The Pontiac (Illinois) Daily Leader, 8 Feb. 2020

Did you know?

When a client gave Samuel A. Maverick 400 cattle to settle a $1,200 debt, the 19th-century south Texas lawyer had no use for them, so he left the cattle unbranded and allowed them to roam freely (supposedly under the supervision of one of his employees). Neighboring stockmen recognized their opportunity and seized it, branding and herding the stray cattle as their own. Maverick eventually recognized the folly of the situation and sold what was left of his depleted herd, but not before his name became synonymous with such unbranded livestock. By the end of the 19th century, the term maverick was being used to refer to individuals who prefer to blaze their own trails.


Lake桑

April 07, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:incarcerate(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for April 6, 2020 is:

incarcerate • \in-KAHR-suh-rayt\  • verb

1 : to put in prison

2 : to subject to confinement

Examples:

Because the accused man presented a serious threat to society, the judge ordered that he remain incarcerated while he awaited trial.

“But he said that some research demonstrates that when incarcerated people earn a degree, recidivism rates can drop by as much as 40%.” — Eliza Fawcett, The Hartford Courant, 24 Feb. 2020

Did you know?

A criminal sentenced to incarceration may wish their debt to society could be canceled; such a wistful felon might be surprised to learn that incarcerate and cancel are related. Incarcerate comes from incarcerare, a Latin verb meaning “to imprison.” That Latin root comes from carcer, meaning “prison.” Etymologists think that cancel probably got its start when the spelling of carcer was modified to cancer, which means “lattice” in Latin—an early meaning of cancel in English was “to mark (a passage) for deletion with lines crossed like a lattice.” Aside from its literal meaning, incarcerate has a figurative application meaning “to subject to confinement,” as in “people incarcerated in their obsessions.”


Lake桑

April 06, 2020 at 01:00PM

又一个周一。

一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

April 06, 2020 at 07:00AM

每日一词:forsooth(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for April 5, 2020 is:

forsooth • \fer-SOOTH\  • adverb

: in truth : indeed — often used to imply contempt or doubt

Examples:

“For sure and forsooth, that means savings for you, dear Renaissance-loving reveler, if you purchase your entry to the weekend-whimsical Irwindale festival by Jan. 6, 2020.” —NBCLosAngeles.com, 26 Dec. 2019

“There is a man haunts the forest, that / abuses our young plants with carving ‘Rosalind’ on / their barks; hangs odes upon hawthorns and elegies / on brambles, all, forsooth, deifying the name of / Rosalind.” — William Shakespeare, As You Like It, 1599

Did you know?

Forsooth sounds like a dated word, but it is still part of modern English; it is primarily used in humorous or ironic contexts, or in a manner intended to play off the word’s archaic vibe. Forsooth was formed from the combination of the preposition for and the noun sooth. Sooth survives as both a noun (meaning “truth” or “reality”) and an adjective (meaning “true,” “sweet,” or “soft”), though it is rarely used by contemporary speakers and writers. It primarily lives on in the verb soothe (which originally meant “to show, assert, or confirm the truth of”) and in the noun soothsayer (that is, “truthsayer”), a name for someone who can predict the future.


Lake桑

April 05, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:solecism(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for April 4, 2020 is:

solecism • \SAH-luh-siz-um\  • noun

1 : an ungrammatical combination of words in a sentence; also : a minor blunder in speech

2 : something deviating from the proper, normal, or accepted order

3 : a breach of etiquette or decorum

Examples:

“We meet at the stroke of midday on an autumnal day in his West London apartment, where I instantly commit two sins from the Common list: being on time and being Scottish. My host kindly overlooks this double solecism and has made a jug of what he calls rosé cup….” — Jan Moir, The Daily Mail (UK), 14 Sept. 2019

“He even took private instruction in English, and succeeded in eliminating his worst faults, though in moments of excitement he was prone to lapse into ‘you-all,’ ‘knowed,’ ‘sure,’ and similar solecisms. He learned to eat and dress and generally comport himself after the manner of civilized man; but through it all he remained himself….” — Jack London, Burning Daylight, 1910

Did you know?

The city of Soloi had a reputation for bad grammar. Located in Cilicia, an ancient coastal nation in Asia Minor, it was populated by Athenian colonists called soloikos (literally “inhabitant of Soloi”). According to historians, the colonists of Soloi allowed their native Athenian Greek to be corrupted and started using words incorrectly. As a result, soloikos gained a new meaning: “speaking incorrectly.” The Greeks used that sense as the basis of soloikismos, meaning “an ungrammatical combination of words.” That root, in turn, gave rise to the Latin soloecismus, the direct ancestor of the English word solecism. Nowadays, solecism can refer to social blunders as well as sloppy syntax.


Lake桑

April 04, 2020 at 01:00PM