每日一词:admonish(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 12, 2018 is:

admonish • \ad-MAH-nish\  • verb

1 a : to indicate duties or obligations to 

b : to express warning or disapproval to especially in a gentle, earnest, or solicitous manner

2 : to give friendly earnest advice or encouragement to

3 : to say (something) as advice or a warning

Examples:

The teacher admonished the students to not speak over one another.

“Ringo Starr rocked, he rolled, he sang, he spoke, he admonished us all to embrace peace and love, not as a tired cliché, but as a tool for the times.” — John W. Barry, The Poughkeepsie (New York) Journal, 21 Sept. 2018

Did you know?

We won’t admonish you if you don’t know the origins of today’s word—its current meanings have strayed slightly from its history. Admonish was borrowed in the 14th century (via Anglo-French amonester) from Vulgar Latin admonestāre, which itself is probably a derivative of admonestus, the past participle of the Latin verb admonēre, meaning “to warn.”  Admonēre, in turn, was formed by the combination of the prefix ad- and monēre, “to warn.” Other descendants of monēre in English include monitor, monitory (“giving a warning”), premonition, and an archaic synonym of admonish, monish. Incidentally, admonish has a number of other synonyms as well, including reprove, rebuke, reprimand, reproach, and chide.


Lake桑

November 12, 2018 at 01:00PM

每日一词:valorous(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 11, 2018 is:

valorous • \VAL-uh-russ\  • adjective

1 : possessing or acting with bravery or boldness : courageous

2 : marked by, exhibiting, or carried out with courage or determination : heroic

Examples:

For carrying three wounded members of his squadron out of harm’s way, the lieutenant was presented with an award that recognized his valorous actions in the heat of battle.

“Why are we so sure that reading books to kids is a valorous act, far superior to cuing up the nefarious iPad? Yes, story time can be tender, and the iPad a mechanized babysitter. But my kids … can seem as mindlessly hooked on the narrative technology of the picture book as on the exploits of the PAW Patrol.” — Julia Turner, The New York Times, 18 May 2018

Did you know?

If you are boldly seeking synonyms for brave, consider valorous as well as courageous, intrepid, dauntless, and bold—all of which mean “having or showing no fear when faced with danger or difficulty.” Brave is the most straightforward of these, implying lack of fear in alarming or difficult circumstances. Courageous carries a sense of stout-hearted resolution in the face of danger, while intrepid suggests downright daring in confronting peril. Dauntless suggests determination and resolution despite danger. Bold typically indicates a forward or defiant tendency to thrust oneself into dangerous situations. Valorous, which comes from Middle English valour, meaning “worth, worthiness, or bravery,” suggests illustrious bravery and sometimes has an archaic or romantic ring.


Lake桑

November 11, 2018 at 01:00PM

每日一词:furlong(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 10, 2018 is:

furlong • \FER-lawng\  • noun

: a unit of distance equal to 220 yards (about 201 meters)

Examples:

“They tramped on again. But they had not gone more than a furlong when the storm returned with fresh fury.” — J. R. R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring, 1954

“Entered in the nine-furlong Pennsylvania Derby is a mix of local runners taking a shot at at least a portion of the $1 million purse and high-profile horses that have been running in graded stakes….” — Teresa Genaro, Forbes, 18 Sept. 2018

Did you know?

Furlong is an English original and can be traced back to Old English furlang, a combination of the noun furh (“furrow“) and the adjective lang (“long”). Though now standardized as a length of 220 yards (or 1/8th of a mile), the furlong was originally defined less precisely as the length of a furrow in a cultivated field. This length was equal to the long side of an acre—an area originally defined as the amount of arable land that could be plowed by a yoke of oxen in a day, but later standardized as an area measuring 220 yards (one furlong) by 22 yards, and now defined as any area measuring 4,840 square yards. In contemporary usage, furlong is often encountered in references to horse racing.


Lake桑

November 10, 2018 at 01:00PM

每日一词:boustrophedon(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 9, 2018 is:

boustrophedon • \boo-struh-FEE-dahn\  • noun

: the writing of alternate lines in opposite directions (as from left to right and from right to left)

Examples:

The archaeologist noticed that the text on the tablet was written in boustrophedon.

“A few days later the same Captain Pasha gave them a gift of an ancient boustrophedon inscription which had been at the door of a Greek chapel; many generations of peasants had rubbed against it, believing it relieved their rheumatism.” — Sally Emerson, Independent on Sunday (London), 13 May 2001

Did you know?

Before the standardization of writing from left to right, ancient Greek inscribers once used a style called boustrophedon, a word meaning literally “turning like oxen in plowing.” When they came to the end of a line, the ancient Greeks simply started the next line immediately below the last letter, writing the letters and words in the opposite direction, and thus following the analogy of oxen plowing left to right, then right to left. Reverse boustrophedon writing has also been found in which the inscribers turned the document 180 degrees before starting a new line so that the words are always read left to right with every half turn. The word boustrophedon itself is formed from the Greek word for the ox or cow, bous, and the verb strephein, which means “to turn.”


Lake桑

November 09, 2018 at 01:00PM

每日一词:palmary(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 8, 2018 is:

palmary • \PAL-muh-ree\  • adjective

: outstanding, best

Examples:

A daughter of missionaries, Pearl S. Buck wrote many works about Chinese life and culture, with her palmary novel, The Good Earth, winning the Pulitzer Prize in 1932.

“The palmary case of telling someone what to do is to issue, for instance, the simple imperative ‘Go away’—an utterance which may or may not have the effect of making its addressee go away, but at any rate tells him to.” — G. J. Warnock, Contemporary Moral Philosophy, 1967

Did you know?

It was the ancient Romans who first used palmarius to describe someone or something extraordinary. Palmarius literally translates as “deserving the palm.” But what does that mean exactly? Was it inspired by palms of hands coming together in applause? That would be a good guess, but the direct inspiration for palmarius was the palm leaf given to a victor in a sports competition. That other palm—the one on the hand—is loosely related. The Romans thought the palm tree’s leaves resembled an outstretched palm of the hand; they thus used their word palma for both meanings, just as we do with palm in English. Now, when we award a noun with the modifier palmary, it signifies that thing as the choicest among possible examples.


Lake桑

November 08, 2018 at 01:00PM

每日一词:derring-do(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 7, 2018 is:

derring-do • \dair-ing-DOO\  • noun

: daring action : daring

Examples:

“They’re two of the most celebrated climbers in the world, struggling to find the right words to describe an astonishing act of human derring-do: On June 3, 2017, Honnold ascended the Freerider route of El Capitan, a nearly 3,000-foot rock face in Yosemite National Park, noted for its glassy-smooth granite and holds that extend only to the fingertips. And he did it all without a rope.” — Scott Tobias, The New York Magazine, 26 Sept. 2018

“But Ben Macintyre, a journalist who specialises in books about spies and derring-do, has crafted his story as a real-life thriller, as tense as John le Carré’s novels, or even Ian Fleming’s.… ‘The Spy and the Traitor’ is a gripping reconstruction, even for those with only a cursory interest in the secret world.” — The Economist, 22 Sept. 2018

Did you know?

Derring-do is a quirky holdover from Middle English that came to occupy its present place in the language by a series of mistakes and misunderstandings. In Middle English, dorring don meant simply “daring to do.” For example, Geoffrey Chaucer used dorring don around 1374 when he described a knight “daring to do” brave deeds. The phrase was misprinted as derring do in a 16th-century edition of a 15th-century work by poet John Lydgate, and Edmund Spenser took it up from there, assuming it was meant as a substantive, or noun phrase. (A glossary to Spenser’s work defined it as “manhood and chevalrie.”) Sir Walter Scott and others in the 19th century got the phrase from Spenser and brought it into modern use.


Lake桑

November 07, 2018 at 01:00PM

每日一词:umbrage(转自 韦氏词典)

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Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 6, 2018 is:

umbrage • \UM-brij\  • noun

1 : a feeling of pique or resentment at some often fancied slight or insult

2 : shady branches : foliage

3 : shade, shadow

4 a : an indistinct indication : vague suggestion : hint

b : a reason for doubt : suspicion

Examples:

“Often, after an active morning, she would spend a sunny afternoon in lying stirless on the turf, at the foot of some tree of friendly umbrage.” — Charlotte Brontë, Shirley, 1849

“If you can find one of these big roosts, the birds are quite entertaining to watch. When they settle in for the evening, they’re noisy and quarrelsome and seem to take umbrage at many things.” — Jim Wright, The Daily Record (Morristown, New Jersey), 26 July 2018

Did you know?

“Deare amber lockes gave umbrage to her face.” This line from a poem by William Drummond, published in 1616, uses umbrage in its original sense of “shade or shadow,” a meaning shared by its Latin source, umbra. (Umbella, the diminutive form of umbra, means “a sunshade or parasol” in Latin and is an ancestor of our word umbrella.) Beginning in the early 17th century, umbrage was also used to mean “a shadowy suggestion or semblance of something,” as when William Shakespeare, in Hamlet, wrote, “His semblable is his mirror, and who else would trace him, his umbrage, nothing more.” In the same century, umbrage took on the pejorative senses “a shadow of suspicion cast on someone” and “displeasure, offense”; the latter is commonly used today in the phrases “give umbrage” or “take umbrage.”


Lake桑

November 06, 2018 at 01:00PM