又一个周一。

一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

June 15, 2020 at 07:00AM

每日一词:divagate(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for June 14, 2020 is:

divagate • \DYE-vuh-gayt\  • verb

: to wander or stray from a course or subject : diverge, digress

Examples:

The novel divagates and meanders through a labyrinth of subplots and asides.

“Having spirited us briskly through Manhattan, New Bedford and Nantucket, and having flushed Ahab from his lair on to the deck of the Pequod, Herman Melville divagates into a disquisition on whale taxonomies.” — Stephen Phillips, The Spectator, 2 Nov. 2019

Did you know?

Divagate hasn’t wandered far in meaning from its Latin ancestors. It descends from the verb divagari, which comes from dis-, meaning “apart,” and vagari, meaning “to wander.” Vagari also gave us vagabond, meaning “a wanderer with no home,” and extravagant, an early, now archaic, sense of which was “wandering away.” Latin vagari is also probably the source of our noun vagary, which now usually means “whim or caprice” but originally meant “journey, excursion, or tour.” Even the verb stray may have evolved from vagari, by way of Vulgar Latin extravagare. Today, divagate can suggest a wandering or straying that is literal (as in “the hikers divagated from the trail”), but it is more often used figuratively (as in “she divagated from the topic”).


Lake桑

June 14, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:whodunit(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for June 13, 2020 is:

whodunit • \hoo-DUN-it\  • noun

: a detective story or mystery story

Examples:

“What made Broadchurch so inherently watchable was its odd-couple detectives: David Tennant’s Hardy was as bitter and cantankerous as Olivia Colman’s Miller was open and warm. The whodunit unfurled episode by episode, crossing off suspects who doubled as relatives and friends.” — Gwen Inhat, The A.V. Club, 10 Apr. 2020

“For all the detective tales that dot television screens, the Agatha Christie-styled whodunit has gone curiously absent from movie theaters. The nostalgia-driven ‘Murder on the Orient Express’ (2017), popular as it was, didn’t do much to dispel the idea that the genre has essentially moved into retirement, content to sit out its days in a warm puffy armchair, occasionally dusting itself off for a remake.” — Jake Coyle, The Associated Press, 25 Nov. 2019

Did you know?

In 1930, Donald Gordon, a book reviewer for News of Books, needed to come up with something to say about a rather unremarkable mystery novel called Half-Mast Murder. “A satisfactory whodunit,” he wrote. The relatively new term (introduced only a year earlier) played fast and loose with spelling and grammar, but whodunit caught on anyway. Other writers tried respelling it who-done-it, and one even insisted on using whodidit, but those sanitized versions lacked the punch of the original and fell by the wayside. Whodunit became so popular that by 1939 at least one language pundit had declared it “already heavily overworked” and predicted it would “soon be dumped into the taboo bin.” History has proven that prophecy false, and whodunit is still going strong.


Lake桑

June 13, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:fictitious(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for June 12, 2020 is:

fictitious • \fik-TISH-us\  • adjective

1 : of, relating to, or characteristic of fiction : imaginary

2 a : conventionally or hypothetically assumed or accepted

b of a name : false, assumed

3 : not genuinely felt

Examples:

“‘Outbreak’ follows a team of U.S. Army medical researchers as they struggle to contain a fictitious disease, dubbed the Motaba virus, that’s quickly spreading in a California town. In the film, they’re successful in halting it in its tracks.” — Brent Lang, Variety, 15 Apr. 2020

“Forensic auditors released details of their findings at the last regular trustee meeting, noting that more than $14 million was mismanaged…. About $600,000 was spent on lavish travel by former administrators and on payments to what appears to be a fictitious vendor.” — Eva-Marie Ayala, The Dallas Morning News, 1 May 2020

Did you know?

Fictitious is related to the Medieval Latin word fictīcius, meaning “artificial,” “imaginary,” “feigned,” or “fraudulent.” It was first used in English as an antonym for natural. For instance, a fake diamond would be referred to as a fictitious one. This use indicates the word’s deeper Latin roots: fictīcius is from the Latin verb fingere, meaning “to mold, fashion, make a likeness of; pretend to be.” Nowadays, fictitious is no longer used for physical things shaped by the human hand. Rather, it is typically used for imaginative creations or for feigned emotions.


Lake桑

June 12, 2020 at 01:00PM

又一个周五!


周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

June 12, 2020 at 12:01PM

每日一词:vilipend(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for June 11, 2020 is:

vilipend • \VIL-uh-pend\  • verb

1 : to hold or treat as of little worth or account : contemn

2 : to express a low opinion of : disparage

Examples:

As a women’s rights movement pioneer, Susan B. Anthony fought against the dicta of those who would vilipend women by treating them as second-class citizens.

“Most people who retire do so after having invested multiple years in employment…. Most are on fixed incomes with tight budgets, hoping for good health and years of stress-free happiness. To vilipend them about their choice of not working, even if they are healthy enough, is just not fair.” — John F. Sauers, letter in The Rochester (New York) Democrat and Chronicle, 26 June 2005

Did you know?

Vilipend first appeared in English in the 15th century and had its heyday during the 19th century—being found in the works of such well-known authors as Sir Walter Scott, William Makepeace Thackeray, and George Meredith—but it fell into relative obscurity by the 20th century. The word comes to us through French from the Latin roots vilis, meaning “cheap” or “vile,” and pendere, meaning “to weigh” or “to estimate.” These roots work in tandem to form a meaning of “to deem to be of little worth.” Each has contributed separately to some other common English words. Other vilis offspring include vile and vilify, while pendere has spawned such terms as append, expend, and dispense.


Lake桑

June 11, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:troubadour(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for June 10, 2020 is:

troubadour • \TROO-buh-dor\  • noun

1 : one of a class of lyric poets and poet-musicians often of knightly rank who flourished from the 11th to the end of the 13th century chiefly in the south of France and the north of Italy and whose major theme was courtly love

2 : a singer especially of folk songs

Examples:

“John Prine was a raspy-voiced heartland troubadour who wrote and performed songs about faded hopes, failing marriages, flies in the kitchen and the desperation of people just getting by. He was, as one of his songs put it, the bard of ‘broken hearts and dirty windows.'” — Matt Schudel, The Independent (UK), 19 Apr. 2020

“With strict social distancing and isolation directives in place at care centers and assisted living facilities, Bressan has adopted the role of a wandering troubadour, offering songs both sacred and secular from outside the windows of patients like Sherry.” — Jon Pompia, The Pueblo (Colorado) Chieftain, 8 Apr. 2020

Did you know?

In the Middle Ages, troubadours were the shining knights of poetry (in fact, some were ranked as high as knights in the feudal class structure). Troubadours made chivalry a high art, writing poems and singing about chivalrous love, creating the mystique of refined damsels, and glorifying the gallant knight on his charger. Troubadour was a fitting name for such creative artists: it derives from an Old Occitan word meaning “to compose.” In modern contexts, troubadour still refers to the song-meisters of the Middle Ages, but it has been extended to cover contemporary poet-musicians as well.


Lake桑

June 10, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:lissome(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for June 9, 2020 is:

lissome • \LISS-um\  • adjective

1 a : easily flexed

b : characterized by easy flexibility and grace : lithe

2 : nimble

Examples:

“A couple of images haunt me from this ‘West Side Story,’ and both do come from video. One is of an anonymous, lissome figure, barely detectable as he or she dances at the end of a long, dark street. The other is of a television playing while Maria and Anita are arguing about a recent gang slaying.” — Ben Brantley, The New York Times, 20 Feb. 2020

“The visiting Americans … look dazed, like astronauts observing lissome green Martian women in a ’50s sci-fi cheapie.” — David Edelstein, Vulture, 23 Aug. 2019

Did you know?

Lissome (sometimes spelled lissom) is a gently altered form of its synonym, lithesome. While lissome tends to be the more popular choice these days, the two words have similar pasts. They both appeared in the 18th century, and they both trace back to the much older lithe, which first appeared in English during the 14th century and comes from an Old English word meaning “gentle.” Lissome can also be an adverb meaning “in a supple or nimble manner,” but this use is rare.


Lake桑

June 09, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:gest(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for June 8, 2020 is:

gest • \JEST\  • noun

1 : a tale of adventures; especially : a romance in verse

2 : adventure, exploit

Examples:

“The best authentic source of Robin Hood stories is the late medieval poem A Gest of Robyn Hode…, a compilation of traditional ballads and stories.” — Guy McDonald, England, 2003

“I was looking forward to this film [Onward] for the last month. My mom follows ‘new’ movie trailers and called me as soon as she saw this one. The gest was essentially an adventure about two brothers.” — Andrew McManus, The Portsmouth (Ohio) Daily Times, 11 Mar. 2020

Did you know?

“Let the Queen know of our gests,” Antony instructs his men after a hard-won victory on the battlefield in William Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra. Great deeds and heroic acts have been the stuff of gests since medieval days; in fact, the word is more often associated with knights and heroes of old than with modern adventurers. We may not be hearing about many 21st century gests, but we do frequently encounter other relatives of the word. Gest traces to Latin gestus, the past participle of the verb gerere, which means “to wage,” “to bear,” or “to carry,” among other things. That Latin verb gave us stoutly enduring words like gesture, ingest, jest, register, and suggest.


Lake桑

June 08, 2020 at 01:00PM

又一个周一。

一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

June 08, 2020 at 07:00AM

每日一词:advocate(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for June 7, 2020 is:

advocate • \AD-vuh-kayt\  • verb

: to support or argue for (a cause, policy, etc.) : to plead in favor of

Examples:

“During quarantine, teachers are broadcasting lessons from their own homes and figuring out new remote-learning technology and platforms on the fly, all while continuing to educate and connect with our kids. Advocating for the children of the world is no easy task, so I wanted to show teachers a little extra love right now.” — Reese Witherspoon, quoted in The Hollywood Reporter, 2 Apr. 2020

“As a journalist, [Zimbabwean Zororo] Makamba often used his platform to advocate for reform and transparency. In his online talk show, ‘State of the Nation,’ as well as appearances on other current affairs programs, Makamba argued for renewable energy, school reform, anti-corruption measures and youth empowerment.” — Andrew R. Chow, Time, 3 Apr. 2020

Did you know?

Benjamin Franklin may have been a great innovator in science and politics, but on the subject of advocate, he was against change. In 1789, he wrote a letter to his compatriot Noah Webster complaining about a “new word”: the verb advocate. Like others of his day, Franklin knew advocate primarily as a noun meaning “one who pleads the cause of another,” and he urged Webster to condemn the verb’s use. In truth, the verb wasn’t as new as Franklin assumed (etymologists have traced it back as far as 1599), though it was apparently surging in popularity in his day. Webster evidently did not heed Franklin’s plea. His famous 1828 dictionary, An American Dictionary of the English Language, entered both the noun and the verb senses of advocate.


Lake桑

June 07, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:capricious(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for June 6, 2020 is:

capricious • \kuh-PRISH-us\  • adjective

: governed or characterized by caprice : impulsiveunpredictable

Examples:

“Like all great children’s writers, [Jacqueline] Wilson and [E.] Nesbit understood how strange and capricious children could be….” — Guy Lodge, Variety, 4 Apr. 2020

“[The television show] Succession doesn’t just get the details right; mirroring the capricious world of media and its greedy overlords, it also makes sweeping plot turns that build to climaxes as bloody as Macbeth.” — Laura Adamczyk, The A.V. Club, 11 Nov. 2019

Did you know?

The noun caprice, which first appeared in English in the mid-17th century, is a synonym of whim. Evidence shows that the adjective capricious debuted before caprice; both words are believed to derive, via French, from Italian capriccio, which originally referred not to a sudden desire but to a sudden shudder of fear. The origin of capriccio is uncertain, but the going theory has a certain charm. Capriccio is thought to perhaps be a compounding of Italian capo, meaning “head,” and riccio, meaning “hedgehog,” The image evoked in this “hedgehog head” mashup is of someone shuddering in fear to such a degree that their hair stands on end, like the spines of a hedgehog.


Lake桑

June 06, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:rendition(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for June 5, 2020 is:

rendition • \ren-DISH-un\  • noun

: the act or result of rendering something: such as

a : a performance or interpretation of something

b : depiction

c : translation

d : surrender; specifically, US law : the surrender by a state of a fugitive to another state charging the fugitive with a crime : interstate extradition

Examples:

“Still, Cosme is bound to offer the ‘hood plenty of surprises, including a mescal-spiked, cactus-studded rendition of Manhattan clam chowder.” — Jeff Gordinier, The New York Times, 2 Sept. 2014

“The best part is the vast majority of adults will love [Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse]. Most know who Spider-Man is. We’ve seen many different renditions of this superhero.” — Andrew McManus, The Portsmouth (Ohio) Daily Times, 27 Apr. 2020

Did you know?

Rendition entered English in the early 17th century and can be traced to the Middle French word reddition and ultimately to the Latin verb reddere, meaning “to return.” The English verb render is another descendant of reddere, so perhaps it is no surprise that rendition fundamentally means “the act or result of rendering.” English speakers also once adopted reddition itself (meaning either “restitution, surrender” or “elucidation”), but that word has mostly dropped out of use. Incidentally, if you’ve guessed that surrender is also from the same word family, you may be right; surrender derives in part from the Anglo-French rendre, which likely influenced the alteration of reddition to rendition.


Lake桑

June 05, 2020 at 01:00PM

又一个周五!


周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

June 05, 2020 at 12:01PM

每日一词:posture(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for June 4, 2020 is:

posture • \PAHSS-cher\  • verb

1 : to cause to assume a given posture : pose

2 : to assume a posture; especially : to strike a pose for effect

3 : to assume an artificial or pretended attitude : attitudinize

Examples:

“During the rut, grabbing a bite to eat was an afterthought for bucks, but right now and in the weeks to come, choosing a prime food source is key to their survival. Sure … bucks are still banging antlers and posturing to prove who’s boss. But this is all happening at, or around, the best food sources in the area.” — Scott Bestul, Field & Stream, 6 Jan. 2020

“It’s also been assumed that a rift exists between Elway and Harris, but according to the player, that couldn’t be further from the truth, despite the two being postured as adversaries over contracts and money.” — Chad Jensen, Sports Illustrated, 11 Jan. 2020

Did you know?

The Latin verb ponere, meaning “to put” or “to place,” had a role in putting quite a few English terms into place, including component, dispose, expose, impose, oppose, posit, position, positive, postpone, and, yes, posture. The past participle of ponerepositus—gave Latin the noun positura, which has the same meaning as the English noun posture. Positura passed through Italian and Middle French and was finally adopted by English speakers as posture in the late 16th century. The verb posture later developed from the noun, finding its place in English at around the midpoint of the 17th century.


Lake桑

June 04, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:compunction(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for June 3, 2020 is:

compunction • \kum-PUNK-shun\  • noun

1 a : anxiety arising from awareness of guilt

b : distress of mind over an anticipated action or result

2 : a twinge of misgiving : scruple

Examples:

“A big reason why Illinois’ population continues to plummet is that college-age youth feel no compunction at all about heading out of state for college.” — editorial board, The Chicago Tribune, 22 Feb. 2020

“Roses can get old and sick, and there are better varieties to try. I have no compunction ripping out a rose that no longer works for me.” — Adrian Higgins, The Washington Post, 13 Feb. 2020

Did you know?

An old proverb says “a guilty conscience needs no accuser,” and it’s true that the sting of a guilty conscience—or a conscience that is provoked by the contemplation of doing something wrong—can prick very hard indeed. The sudden guilty “prickings” of compunction are reflected in the word’s etymological history. Compunction comes (via Anglo-French compunction and Middle English compunccioun) from Latin compungere, which means “to prick hard” or “to sting.” Compungere, in turn, derives from pungere, meaning “to prick,” which is the ancestor of some other prickly words in English, such as puncture and even point.


Lake桑

June 03, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:eolian(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for June 2, 2020 is:

eolian • \ee-OH-lee-un\  • adjective

: borne, deposited, produced, or eroded by the wind

Examples:

The park is known for its eolian caves—chambers formed in sandstone cliffs by powerful winds.

“If an extremely tenuous atmosphere like that of Pluto can support the generation of bedforms from wind-driven sediment, what kind of eolian activity might we see on places like Io (a moon of Jupiter)…?” — Alexander Hayes, quoted in The Los Angeles Times, 31 May 2018

Did you know?

When Aeolus blew into town, things really got moving. He was the Greek god of the winds and the king of the floating island of Aeolia. In The Odyssey, Homer claims Aeolus helped Odysseus by giving him a favorable wind. Aeolus also gave English speakers a few terms based on his name, including the adjective eolian (also spelled aeolian), which is often used for wind-sculpted geological features such as caves and dunes, and aeolian harp, the name for an instrument that makes music when the wind blows across its strings.


Lake桑

June 02, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:stiction(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for June 1, 2020 is:

stiction • \STIK-shun\  • noun

: the force required to cause one body in contact with another to begin to move

Examples:

Stiction is stationary friction. Starting the bolt turning takes more force than keeping it turning. The tighter the bolt, the more stiction can affect torque readings.” — Jim Kerr, SRTForums.com, 4 Mar. 2004

“The theme of blue continues on the fork stanchions. The upside-down fork itself is the same Showa unit seen on the standard bike, but in this case the inner tubes feature a special nitride coating to help reduce stiction and provide a smoother stroke.” — Zaran Mody, ZigWheels.com, 14 Apr. 2020

Did you know?

Stiction has been a part of the English language since at least 1946, when it appeared in a journal of aeronautics. While stiction refers to the force needed to get an object to move from a position at rest, it is not related to the verb stick. The word is a blend word formed from the st- of static (“of or relating to bodies at rest”) and the –iction of friction (“the force that resists relative motion between two bodies in contact”). So, basically, it means “static friction” (or to put it another way, “stationary friction”).


Lake桑

June 01, 2020 at 01:00PM

又一个周一。

一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

June 01, 2020 at 07:00AM

每日一词:palmy(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for May 31, 2020 is:

palmy • \PAH-mee\  • adjective

1 : marked by prosperity : flourishing

2 : abounding in or bearing palms

Examples:

“The new breed of the Silicon Valley lived for work. They were disciplined to the point of back spasms. They worked long hours and kept working on weekends. They became absorbed in their companies the way men once had in the palmy days of the automobile industry.” — Tom Wolfe, Hooking Up, 2000

“In Beaufort Road was a house, occupied in its palmier days, by Mr Shorthouse, a manufacturer of acids….” — J.R.R. Tolkien, letter, July 1964

Did you know?

The palm branch has traditionally been used as a symbol of victory. It is no wonder then that the word palm came to mean “victory” or “triumph” in the late 14th century, thanks to the likes of Geoffrey Chaucer. Centuries later, William Shakespeare would employ palmy as a synonym for triumphant or flourishing in the tragedy Hamlet when the character Horatio speaks of the “palmy state of Rome / A little ere the mightiest Julius fell.”


Lake桑

May 31, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:gamut(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for May 30, 2020 is:

gamut • \GAM-ut\  • noun

1 : the whole series of recognized musical notes

2 : an entire range or series

Examples:

“Possibly the most interesting man-made structural material is reinforced concrete…. It is economical, available almost everywhere, fire-resistant, and can be designed to be light-weight to reduce the dead load or to have a whole gamut of strengths to satisfy structural needs.” — Mario Salvadori, Why Buildings Stand Up, 1990

“[Beverly] Long, whose previous novels run a limited gamut from romance to paranormal romance to romantic suspense, scores well in her transition to hard-boiled thriller.” — Jay Strafford, The Free Lance-Star (Fredericksburg, Virginia), 21 Mar. 2020

Did you know?

To get the lowdown on gamut, we have to dive to the bottom of a musical scale to which the 11th-century musician and monk Guido of Arezzo applied his particular system of solmization—that is, of using syllables to denote the tones of a musical scale. Guido called the first line of his bass staff gamma and the first note in his scale ut, which meant that gamma ut was the term for a note written on the first staff line. In time, gamma ut underwent a shortening to gamut but climbed the scale of meaning. It expanded to cover all the notes of Guido’s scale, then to cover all the notes in the range of an instrument, and, eventually, to cover an entire range of any sort.


Lake桑

May 30, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:assail(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for May 29, 2020 is:

assail • \uh-SAIL\  • verb

1 : to attack violently : assault

2 : to encounter, undertake, or confront energetically

3 : to oppose, challenge, or criticize harshly and forcefully

4 a : to trouble or afflict in a manner that threatens to overwhelm

b : to be perceived by (a person, a person’s senses, etc.) in a strongly noticeable and usually unpleasant way

Examples:

Most worthwhile achievements require that one persevere even when assailed by doubts.

“What does it even mean to be good in a world as complex as ours, when great inequity remains unaddressed and often seems too daunting to assail, and when seemingly benign choices—which shoes to buy, which fruit to eat—can come with the moral baggage of large carbon footprints or the undercompensated labor of migrant workers?” — Nancy Kaffer, The Detroit (Michigan) Free Press, 9 Jan. 2020

Did you know?

Assail comes from an Anglo-French verb, assaillir, which itself traces back to the Latin verb assilire (“to leap upon”). Assilire combines the prefix ad- (“to, toward”) with the Latin verb salire, meaning “to leap.” (Salire is the root of a number of English words related to jumping or leaping, such as somersault and sally, as well as assault, a synonym of assail.) When assail was first used in the 13th century, it meant “to make a violent physical attack upon.” By the early 15th century, English speakers were using the term to mean “to attack with words or arguments.” Now the verb can refer to any kind of aggressive encounter, even if it is not necessarily violent or quarrelsome, as in “Upon entering the room, we were assailed by a horrible odor.”


Lake桑

May 29, 2020 at 01:00PM

又一个周五!


周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

May 29, 2020 at 12:00PM

每日一词:empirical(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for May 28, 2020 is:

empirical • \im-PEER-uh-kul\  • adjective

1 : originating in or based on observation or experience

2 : relying on experience or observation alone often without due regard for system and theory 

3 : capable of being verified or disproved by observation or experiment 

4 : of or relating to empiricism

Examples:

“‘We have really good empirical research dating back to the 1980s demonstrating that kids who are restricted around treat foods often just want to eat them more,’ said Charlotte Markey, Ph.D., a professor of psychology at Rutgers University….” — Virginia Sole-Smith, The New York Times, 17 Apr. 2020

“Burger King’s advertising has been telling us that the Impossible Whopper tastes just like a Whopper. And so, in the spirit of empirical science and discovery, I ventured to a Burger King this week to test the claim.” — Eric Felten, The Examiner (Washington, DC), 31 Oct. 2019

Did you know?

When empirical first appeared as an adjective in English, it meant simply “in the manner of an empiric.” An empiric was a member of an ancient sect of doctors who practiced medicine based exclusively on observation or experience as contrasted with those who relied on theory or philosophy. The name empiric derives from Latin empīricus, itself from Greek empeirikós, meaning “based on observation (of medical treatment), experienced.” The root of the Greek word (-peiros) is a derivative of peîra, meaning “attempt, trial, test.”


Lake桑

May 28, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:longueur(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for May 27, 2020 is:

longueur • \lawn-GUR\  • noun

: a dull and tedious passage or section (as of a book, play, or musical composition) — usually used in plural

Examples:

The otherwise crisp pacing of the movie is marred by some unnecessary longueurs that do little to advance the main story.

“Small, clever musicals are fragile things, though, and I don’t want to oversell this one in praising it. ‘Scotland, PA’ still needs to cure a few structural hiccups (the first act seems to end twice) and to address its longueurs and lapses of logic.” — Jesse Green, The New York Times, 23 Oct. 2019

Did you know?

You’ve probably come across long, tedious sections of books, plays, or musical works before, but perhaps you didn’t know there was a word for them. English speakers began using the French borrowing longueur in the late 18th century. As in English, French longueurs are tedious passages, with longueur itself literally meaning “length.” An early example of longueur used in an English text is from 18th-century writer Horace Walpole, who wrote in a letter, “Boswell’s book is gossiping; . . . but there are woful longueurs, both about his hero and himself.”


Lake桑

May 27, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:homonymous(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for May 26, 2020 is:

homonymous • \hoh-MAH-nuh-mus\  • adjective

1 : ambiguous

2 : having the same designation

3 : of, relating to, or being homonyms

Examples:

“The Chelyabinsk meteorite became a media celebrity after the videos of its explosion in mid-air, occurring in February 2013 near the homonymous city, went viral on social networks.” — Luca Maltagliati, Nature, 17 Feb. 2017

“Like the bird homonymous with his name, ‘Cro’ operates like he’s under the cover of night. Though Cromartie’s numerically best game came against Tulane this fall, in which the senior recorded six tackles and a sack, Downing tabbed South Florida and Connecticut as the raider’s brightest.” — Katherine Fominykh, The Capital Gazette (Annapolis, Maryland), 12 Dec. 2019

Did you know?

The “ambiguous” sense of homonymous refers mainly to words that have two or more meanings. Logicians and scientists who wanted to refer to (or complain about) such equivocal words chose a name for them based on Latin and Greek, from Greek hom- (“same”) and onyma (“name”). In time, English speakers came up with another sense of homonymous referring to two things having the same name (Hawaii, the state, and Hawaii, the island, for example). Next came the use of homonymous to refer to homonyms, such as see and sea. There’s also a zoological sense. Sheep and goats whose right horn spirals to the right and left horn spirals to the left are said to be homonymous.


Lake桑

May 26, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:instigate(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for May 25, 2020 is:

instigate • \IN-stuh-gayt\  • verb

: to goad or urge forward : provoke

Examples:

“The big thing about effective advertising is that it uses data effectively to instigate behavior.” — Nicole Ortiz, Adweek, 14 Apr. 2020

“In his usual genuine and silly fashion, [Chris] Martin sincerely explained his intent for making the live video and instigating a new series of live Instagram performances. ‘What would be nice would be to check in with some of you out there and see how you’re doing…. I had an idea that we could call this thing “Together At Home.” And who knows, maybe tomorrow someone else will take it over,’ he said.” — Sean Glaister, The Johns Hopkins (University) News-Letter, 6 Apr. 2020

Did you know?

Instigate is often used as a synonym of incite (as in “hoodlums instigating violence”), but the two words differ slightly in their overall usage. Incite usually stresses an act of stirring something up that one did not necessarily initiate (“the court’s decision incited riots”). Instigate implies responsibility for initiating or encouraging someone else’s action and usually suggests dubious or underhanded intent (“he was charged with instigating a conspiracy”). Another similar word, foment, implies causing something by means of persistent goading (“the leader’s speeches fomented a rebellion”). Deriving from the past participle of the Latin verb instigare, instigate stepped into English in the 16th century, after incite and ahead of foment.


Lake桑

May 25, 2020 at 01:00PM

又一个周一。

一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

May 25, 2020 at 07:00AM

每日一词:xeriscape(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for May 24, 2020 is:

xeriscape • \ZEER-uh-skayp\  • noun

: a landscaping method developed especially for arid and semiarid climates that utilizes water-conserving techniques (such as the use of drought-tolerant plants, mulch, and efficient irrigation)

Examples:

After the severe drought led to local water restrictions, some residents began to look into xeriscape for more easily maintainable yards.

“This perennial has evergreen leaves from 2­-3 feet in length while the flower stalks can rise up to 5 feet with coral-colored tubular flowers. It’s drought-resistant, and the flowers can attract hummingbirds. This one would be great for xeriscape or low-maintenance gardens.” — Tom Ingram, The Tulsa (Oklahoma) World, 29 Feb. 2020

Did you know?

Xēros is the Greek word for “dry” that is the base for a handful of English words related to mainly dry printing (xerography) and dry, or xerophilous, habitats and their plants. In the early 1980s, the Greek adjective was used to name a type of landscaping practiced primarily in the arid western regions of the United States. (The Water Department of Denver, Colorado, is credited with the coinage.) Xeriscape, as it is called, uses plants that require little water as well as techniques that efficiently use water and reduce evaporation.


Lake桑

May 24, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:shaggy-dog(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for May 23, 2020 is:

shaggy-dog • \shag-ee-DAWG\  • adjective

: of, relating to, or being a long-drawn-out circumstantial story concerning an inconsequential happening that impresses the teller as humorous or interesting but the hearer as boring and pointless; also : of, relating to, or being a similar humorous story whose humor lies in the pointlessness or irrelevance of the plot or punch line

Examples:

“Like most of Irving’s other books, ‘Owen Meany’ is kind of a shaggy-dog story. It wanders all over the place and there are many seemingly loose ends.” — Neil Gittleman, quoted in The Dayton (Ohio) Daily News, 13 Apr. 2020

“A shaggy-dog tale that treats crisscrossing forklift traffic as a sight worthy of the Blue Danube waltz, the German feature ‘In the Aisles’ mostly takes place in an anonymous, highway-side megastore….” — Ben Kenigsberg, The New York Times, 13 June 2019

Did you know?

The origin of the adjective shaggy-dog isn’t truly known, but lexicographer Eric Partridge rather believably tells us that it originated with a shaggy-dog story of the amusing sort that involves—of course!—a shaggy dog. Today, the word sometimes refers to a rambling story that impresses the teller as humorous or interesting but the hearer as boring and pointless, but it can also refer to a similar story (or movie or TV show) that is actually humorous and whose humor lies in its very pointlessness or irrelevance.


Lake桑

May 23, 2020 at 01:00PM