每日一词:bonhomie(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for January 21, 2020 is:

bonhomie • \bah-nuh-MEE\  • noun

: good-natured easy friendliness

Examples:

“For older athletes, the bonhomie among teammates and rivals who have spent years sprinting or skating together, or boxing one another out under the rim, is often as important as the exercise. Many have become friends off the court, sharing meals and socializing after games.” — Robert Weisman, The Boston Globe, 4 Dec. 2019

“Throughout its history, the hugely successful TV show ‘Downton Abbey’ warmly embraced the tradition of the Christmas episode, a seasonally themed special that continued the endless narrative but with a particularly romantic and sentimental nod to what audiences wanted on Christmas Day, a time of familial togetherness and bonhomie.” — Chris Jones, The Chicago Tribune, 19 Nov. 2019 

Did you know?

English speakers borrowed bonhomie from French, where the word was created from bonhomme, which means “good-natured man” and is itself a composite of two other French words: bon, meaning “good,” and homme, meaning “man.” That French compound traces to two Latin terms, bonus (meaning “good”) and homo (meaning either “man” or “human being”). English speakers have warmly embraced bonhomie and its meaning, but we have also anglicized the pronunciation in a way that may make native French speakers cringe. (We hope they will be good-natured about it!)


Lake桑

January 21, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:dauntless(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for January 20, 2020 is:

dauntless • \DAWNT-lus\  • adjective

: incapable of being intimidated or subdued : fearless, undaunted

Examples:

With dauntless persistence, the ship’s crew navigated the vessel through the unexpected storm, escaping with minimal damage and no casualties.

“Dug, as dauntless as ever, travels to the stronghold of his foes. The entrance is shielded by one gate after another, each shunting into position with a mighty clang, and finally, in the movie’s best gag, by a little sliding bolt, such as you might find on a garden shed.” — Anthony Lane, The New Yorker, 26 Feb. 2018

Did you know?

The history of the world is peopled with dauntless men and women who refused to be “subdued” or “tamed” by fear. The word dauntless can be traced back to Latin domare, meaning “to tame” or “to subdue.” When our verb daunt (a domare descendant adopted by way of Anglo-French) was first used in the 14th century, it shared these meanings. The now-obsolete “tame” sense referred to the taming or breaking of wild animals, particularly horses: an undaunted horse was an unbroken horse. Not until the late 16th century did we use undaunted with the meaning “undiscouraged and courageously resolute” to describe people. By then, such lionhearted souls could also be described as “undauntable” as well as “dauntless.”


Lake桑

January 20, 2020 at 01:00PM

又一个周一。

一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

January 20, 2020 at 07:00AM

每日一词:intercalate(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for January 19, 2020 is:

intercalate • \in-TER-kuh-layt\  • verb

1 : to insert (something, such as a day) in a calendar

2 : to insert between or among existing elements or layers

Examples:

“The fossiliferous deposits … consist of pale pinkish-orange brown clays, brownish grey siltstones and shale, and greenish grey fine to medium grained sandstones intercalated with dark grey conglomerates….” — M. A. Khan, et al., The Journal of Animal and Plant Sciences, 31 Dec. 2011

“In order for a lunar calendar to keep up with the solar year and the seasons, it is necessary to intercalate a 13th lunar month every two or three years.” — Sacha Stern, Calendars in Antiquity: Empires, States, and Societies, 2012

Did you know?

Intercalate was formed from the Latin prefix inter-, meaning “between” or “among,” and the Latin verb calāre, meaning “to proclaim” or “to announce.” It was originally associated with proclaiming the addition of a day or month in a calendar. An instance of intercalation occurred in the earliest versions of the Roman calendar, which originally consisted of 304 days and 10 months and was determined by the lunar cycle (the remaining 61.25 days of winter were apparently ignored). According to some Roman legends, it was Numa Pompilius, the second king of Rome, who intercalated the months January and February. Eventually, the word’s use broadened to include other instances of introducing new elements or layers into a preexisting system.


Lake桑

January 19, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:vicarious(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for January 18, 2020 is:

vicarious • \vye-KAIR-ee-us\  • adjective

1 : experienced or realized through imaginative or sympathetic participation in the experience of another

2 a : serving instead of someone or something else

b : that has been delegated

3 : performed or suffered by one person as a substitute for another or to the benefit or advantage of another : substitutionary

4 : occurring in an unexpected or abnormal part of the body instead of the usual one

Examples:

“‘Gravity’ is a brilliantly realized, completely riveting, dread-drenched science fiction thriller about two astronauts stranded in orbit around Earth. And it turns out to be one amazing vicarious experience, simultaneously dream and nightmare, with a set of cinematic illusions that simply—well, maybe not so simply—astounds.” — Bill Wine, The Chestnut Hill Local (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 15 Nov. 2019

“What kind of a play might Shakespeare have written if Lady Macbeth, rather than her husband, had been given the leading role? This is the premise of Kally Lloyd-Jones’s bold and haunting new work, in which she tries to imagine the full story of a woman so deprived of purpose, so hell-bent on vicarious power, that she will goad her husband to commit regicide.” — The Guardian (London), 9 Aug. 2017

Did you know?

If you act in someone’s stead, you take his or her place, at least temporarily. The oldest meaning of vicarious, which dates to the first half of the 1600s, is “serving instead of someone or something else.” The word vicarious derives from the Latin noun vicis, which means “change,” “alternation,” or “stead.” Vicis is also the source of the English prefix vice- (as in “vice president”), meaning “one that takes the place of.”


Lake桑

January 18, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:tontine(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for January 17, 2020 is:

tontine • \TAHN-teen\  • noun

: a joint financial arrangement whereby the participants usually contribute equally to a prize that is awarded entirely to the participant who survives all the others

Examples:

“For denizens of the realm, tontines were a very popular twist on the annuity because they appealed to the gambling spirit. An annuity would pay you a steady trickle of money (boring). A tontine would pay you more and more as time went on because other people would be dying and you would be accumulating their shares.” — Jeff Guo, The Washington Post, 28 Sept. 2015

“Lord Deverell wanted a loan from me based upon his contribution. Wanted out of the tontine entirely, rather, but without having to go to the trouble of dying.” — Theresa Romain, Lady Notorious, 2019

Did you know?

Tontines were named after their creator, a Neapolitan banker named Lorenzo Tonti. In 1653, Tonti convinced investors to buy shares in a fund he had created. Each year, the investors earned dividends, and when one of them died, their share of the profits was redistributed among the survivors. When the last investor died, the capital reverted to the state. Louis XIV of France used tontines to save his ailing treasury and to fund municipal projects, and private tontines (where the last surviving investor—and subsequently their heirs—got the cash instead of the state) became popular throughout Europe and the U.S. Eventually, though, tontines were banned; there was just too much temptation for unscrupulous investors to bump off their fellow subscribers.


Lake桑

January 17, 2020 at 01:00PM

又一个周五!


周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

January 17, 2020 at 12:00PM