每日一词:sporadic(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 24, 2019 is:

sporadic • \spuh-RAD-ik\  • adjective

: occurring occasionally, singly, or in irregular or random instances

Examples:

The team’s regular meetings became sporadic over the summer months, when at some points up to half of its members were on vacation.

“Continuous permafrost hugs the Hudson Bay coast and spreads inland about 75 kilometres before becoming discontinuous and sporadic. Like peat, permafrost is an effective storehouse of greenhouse gases.” — Kenyon Wallace, The Toronto Star, 27 May 2019

Did you know?

Sporadic describes the distribution of something across space or time that is not frequent enough to fill an area or period, often in scattered instances or isolated outbursts (as in “sporadic applause”). The word comes from Medieval Latin sporadicus, which is itself derived from Greek sporadēn, meaning “here and there.” It is also related to the Greek verb speirein (“to sow”), the ancestor from which we get our word spore (the reproductive cell of a fungus, microorganism, or some plants), hinting at the seeming scattered nature by which such cells distribute and germinate.


Lake桑

August 24, 2019 at 01:00PM

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每日一词:excursion(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 23, 2019 is:

excursion • \ik-SKER-zhun\  • noun

1 a : a going out or forth : expedition

b (1) : a usually brief pleasure trip

(2) : a trip at special reduced rates

2 : deviation from a direct, definite, or proper course; especially : digression

3 : a movement outward and back or from a mean position or axis; also : the distance traversed : amplitude

Examples:

Lewis Carroll’s Through The Looking Glass is an excursion into a fantastical world where nothing is what it seems to be, and everything appears to be what it is not.

“Every morning for 10 years, Joey Gamez has hopped on a boat to take customers of his Golden State Sportfishing business on a San Francisco Bay excursion, a hobby-turned-business for the 42-year-old.” — Alejandra Reyes-Velarde, The Los Angeles Times, 15 July 2019

Did you know?

In Latin, the prefix ex- means “out of” and the verb currere means “to run.” When the two are put together, they form the verb excurrere, literally “to run out” or “to extend.” Excurrere gave rise not only to excursion but also to excurrent (an adjective for things having channels or currents that run outward) and excursus (meaning “an appendix or digression that contains further exposition of some point or topic”). Other words deriving from currere include corridor, curriculum, and among newer words, parkour.


Lake桑

August 23, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:chivy(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 22, 2019 is:

chivy • \CHIV-ee\  • verb

1 : to tease or annoy with persistent petty attacks

2 : to move or obtain by small maneuvers

Examples:

Marielle watched her little brother as he chivied an olive from the jar with his fingers.

“To encounter Hemingway as an adult was to be faced with a man whose appetite for supposedly masculine pursuits was so assiduously cultivated as to border on parody…. He would routinely chivy his friends into the ring in order to engage in tests of strength.” — Matthew Adams, The Washington Post, 17 May 2017

Did you know?

Chivy, which is also spelled chivvy, became established in our language in the 19th century and, at first, meant “to harass or chase.” Early usage examples are of people chivying a chicken around to catch it and of a person chivying around food that is frying. The verb comes from a British noun chivy meaning “chase” or “hunt.” That chivy is believed to be derived from Chevy Chase—a term for “chase” or “confusion” that is taken from the name of a ballad describing the 1388 battle of Otterburn between the Scottish and English. (A chase in this context is an unenclosed tract of land that is used as a game preserve.)


Lake桑

August 22, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:misnomer(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 21, 2019 is:

misnomer • \miss-NOH-mer\  • noun

1 : the misnaming of a person in a legal instrument

2 a : a use of a wrong or inappropriate name

b : a wrong name or inappropriate designation

Examples:

“When you see flashes along the horizon on a summer night, it could be lightning within a storm that’s more than 100 miles away. ‘Heat lightning‘ is a misnomer—they’re just ordinary strikes that lack thunder and appear diffuse when witnessed from a long distance.” — John Boyer, The Richmond (Virginia) Times Dispatch, 27 June 2019

“Ten candidates will debate for two hours each night Wednesday and Thursday—although ‘debate’ is something of a misnomer, in the LincolnDouglas sense of the word, given the time constraints and limited ability for great depth or lengthy engagement.” — Mark Z. Barabak and Michael Finnegan, The Los Angeles Times, 25 June 2019

Did you know?

What’s in a name? Well, in some cases, a name will contain an error, a misunderstanding, or a mislabeling. Historians have long noted that the Holy Roman Empire was neither holy, Roman, nor an empire. The Battle of Bunker Hill was actually fought on Breed’s Hill. And the Pennsylvania Dutch are in fact of German ancestry. For such cases, we have the term misnomer, which comes from the Anglo-French verb mesnomer (“to misname”) and ultimately has its roots in nomen, the Latin word for “name.”


Lake桑

August 21, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:ethereal(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 20, 2019 is:

ethereal • \ih-THEER-ee-ul\  • adjective

1 a : of or relating to the regions beyond the earth

b : celestial, heavenly

c : unworldly, spiritual

2 a : lacking material substance : immaterial, intangible

b : marked by unusual delicacy or refinement

c : suggesting the heavens or heaven

3 : relating to, containing, or resembling a chemical ether

Examples:

“Like Howe’s Omniverse, van Herpen’s finale piece used aluminum and stainless steel on the skeleton, covering it with a thin layer of feathers that ruffled, turning as if graced with gust of wind. The penultimate look channeled the same ethereal vibe, featuring laser-cut strips of fabric that give the appearance of pulsating angel wings.” — Barry Samaha, Surface, 2 July 2019

Colored Everything has an air of maturity about it. … What you’ll hear is seemingly endless layers of airy, ethereal sound that makes you wonder what kinds of instruments are being used to create such sounds.” — Jon Bodell, The Concord (New Hampshire) Insider, 18 June 2019

Did you know?

If you’re burning to know the history of ethereal, you’re in the right spirit to fully understand that word’s etymology. The ancient Greeks believed that the Earth was composed of earth, air, fire, and water, but that the heavens and its denizens were made of a purer, less tangible substance known as either ether or quintessence. Ether was often described as an invisible light or fire, and its name derives from the Greek aithein, a verb meaning “to ignite” or “to blaze.” When ethereal, the adjectival kin of ether, debuted in English in the 1500s, it referred to regions beyond the Earth or anything that seemed to originate from there.


Lake桑

August 20, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:brandish(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 19, 2019 is:

brandish • \BRAN-dish\  • verb

1 : to shake or wave (something, such as a weapon) menacingly

2 : to exhibit in an ostentatious or aggressive manner

Examples:

Michael appeared before the town council brandishing a petition signed by 500 people asking the town to increase funding for the public skate park.

“Our plates of crisply battered cod, chips and mushy peas and our drinks arrived and we set to. Atticus ate with his fingers…. ‘Do you know how to use a knife and fork?’ I said to him, purely out of interest. He said he did know and he picked them up and brandished them at me to prove it. The fork was in his right hand, the knife in his left. ‘Bravo,’ I said.” — Jeremy Clarke, The Spectator, 21 July 2018

Did you know?

Often when we encounter the word brandish in print, it is soon followed by a word for a weapon, such as knife or handgun. That’s appropriate given the word’s etymology: it is a descendant of the Middle English braundisshen, which derives, via brandiss- (a stem of the Anglo-French brandir), from brant, braund, meaning “sword.” Nowadays you can brandish things other than weapons, however. The figurative usage of brandish rose alongside its earliest literal usage in the 14th century. When you brandish something that isn’t a weapon (such as a sign), you are in effect waving it in someone’s face so that it cannot be overlooked.


Lake桑

August 19, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:hiatus(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 18, 2019 is:

hiatus • \hye-AY-tus\  • noun

1 a : a break in or as if in a material object : gap

b biology : a gap or passage in an anatomical part or organ

2 a : an interruption in time or continuity : break; especially : a period when something (as a program or activity) is suspended or interrupted

b : the occurrence of two vowel sounds without pause or intervening consonantal sound

Examples:

“The bus service will run from Dec. 3 to Dec. 21 before going on hiatus for the holidays. Regular service will resume on Jan. 7.” — Alison Brownlee, The Huntsville Forester, November 27, 2012

“It’s a new era for pop/rockstar Adam Lambert. After a four-year hiatus from his solo career, during which he became the new frontman for Queen, the singer returned earlier this year with two new singles and the announcement of his upcoming fourth studio album Velvet.” — Stephen Daw, Billboard.com, 19 June 2019

Did you know?

Hiatus comes from hiare, a Latin verb meaning “to gape” or “to yawn,” and first appeared in English in the middle of the 16th century. Originally, the word referred to a gap or opening in something, such as a cave opening in a cliff. In the 18th century, British novelist Laurence Sterne used the word humorously in his novel Tristram Shandy, writing of “the hiatus in Phutatorius’s breeches.” These days, hiatus is usually used in a temporal sense to refer to a pause or interruption (as in a song), or a period during which an activity is temporarily suspended (such as a hiatus from teaching).


Lake桑

August 18, 2019 at 01:00PM