每日一词:rife(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 31, 2020 is:

rife • \RYFE\  • adjective

1 : prevalent especially to an increasing degree

2 : abundant, common

3 : copiously supplied : abounding

Examples:

“Like most colleges and universities, ad schools have found themselves going virtual … because of the novel coronavirus pandemic. However, students soon graduating from these programs are facing a job market rife with layoffs, hiring freezes and canceled internships….” — Doug Zanger, Adweek, 8 June 2020

“Red-tailed hawks and some other raptors have learned that our highways are rife with rodents, so they perch on light poles, nearby trees or signs and wait to spot a meal.” — Val Cunningham, The Star Tribune (Minneapolis, Minnesota), 9 June 2020

Did you know?

English is rife with words that have Germanic connections, many of which have been handed down to us from Old English. Rife is one of those words. Not a whole lot has changed with rife in its long history. We continue to use the word for negative things, especially those that are widespread or prevalent. Examples are “shoplifting was rife” or “the city was rife with greed and corruption.” Rumors and speculation are also frequently described as “rife.” But rife can also be appropriately used for good or neutral things. For example, you might speak of the summer garden being “rife” with scents.


Lake桑

July 31, 2020 at 01:00PM

又一个周五!


周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

July 31, 2020 at 12:00PM

每日一词:catastrophe(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 30, 2020 is:

catastrophe • \kuh-TASS-truh-fee\  • noun

1 : a momentous tragic event ranging from extreme misfortune to utter overthrow or ruin

2 : utter failure : fiasco

3 a : a violent and sudden change in a feature of the earth

b : a violent usually destructive natural event (such as a supernova)

4 : the final event of the dramatic action especially of a tragedy

Examples:

“We are a nation that’s used to catastrophes. We deal with avalanches, earthquakes, eruptions, and so on.” — Alma Möller, quoted in The New Yorker, 1 June 2020

“Be the challenge grave illness, divorce, a natural disaster or an economic meltdown, the rebound represents how we respond, how we stand strong in the face of catastrophe, how we refuse to give up.” — Designers Today, 27 May 2020

Did you know?

When English speakers first borrowed the Greek word katastrophē (from katastrephein, meaning “to overturn”) as catastrophe in the 1500s, they used it for the conclusion or final event of a dramatic work, especially of a tragedy. In time, catastrophe came to be used more generally of any unhappy conclusion, or disastrous or ruinous end. By the mid-18th century, it was being used to denote truly devastating events, such as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. Finally, it came to be applied to things that are only figuratively catastrophic—burnt dinners, lost luggage, really bad movies, etc.


Lake桑

July 30, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:pejorative(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 29, 2020 is:

pejorative • \pih-JOR-uh-tiv\  • adjective

: having negative connotations; especially : tending to disparage or belittle : depreciatory

Examples:

The captain has come under fire for making pejorative remarks about teammates.

“There are only two ways to influence human behavior: you can manipulate it or you can inspire it. When I mention manipulation, this is not necessarily pejorative; it’s a very common and fairly benign tactic.” — Simon Sinek, Start with Why, 2009

Did you know?

“If you can’t say something nice, don’t say anything at all.” Parents have given that good advice for years, but unfortunately many people haven’t heeded it. The word pejorative makes it clear that both English and Latin speakers have long known that disparaging words can make a bad situation worse. Pejorative derives from the Late Latin adjective pējōrātus, which in turn comes from the Latin verb pējōrāre, meaning “to make or become worse.” Although pejorative words have probably always been part of English, the adjective pejorative has only been found in English texts since the late 1880s. Before then, English speakers could rely on older synonyms of pejorative such as derogatory and uncomplimentary to describe disparaging words.


Lake桑

July 29, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:mesmerize(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 28, 2020 is:

mesmerize • \MEZ-muh-ryze\  • verb

1 : to subject to mesmerism; also : hypnotize

2 : spellbind

Examples:

The crowd was mesmerized by the flawlessly synchronous movements of the acrobats.

“Control is a coveted possession in Credulity, Ogden’s illuminating recent study of American mesmerism. The mesmerists and skeptics she studies all seem to want it; at any rate, they want to consider themselves rational and self-possessed enough not to fall under anyone else’s. During this brief, strange moment between 1836 and the late 1850s, mesmerizing another person—or seeing someone get mesmerized, or denouncing mesmerists as charlatans—became a way of stockpiling control for one’s own use.” — Max Nelson, The New York Review of Books, 24 July 2019

Did you know?

Experts can’t agree on whether Franz Anton Mesmer (1734-1815) was a quack or a genius, but all concede that the late 18th-century physician’s name is the source of the word mesmerize. In his day, Mesmer was the toast of Paris, where he enjoyed the support of notables including Queen Marie Antoinette. He treated patients with a force he termed animal magnetism. Many believe that what he actually used was what we now call hypnotism. Mesmer’s name was first applied to a technique for inducing hypnosis in 1784.


Lake桑

July 28, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:anomaly(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 27, 2020 is:

anomaly • \uh-NAH-muh-lee\  • noun

1 : something different, abnormal, peculiar, or not easily classified : something anomalous

2 : deviation from the common rule : irregularity

3 : the angular distance of a planet from its perihelion as seen from the sun

Examples:

“Thermal Scanning uses intelligent thermal technology and checks the temperature of everyone entering the premises and triggers necessary alarms in case of an anomaly in the temperature.” — Business World, 12 June 2020

“[Rich] Wingo is also part of a statistical anomaly of sorts: He scored one point in his NFL career. He is one of four Packers to have scored a single point….” — Jim Owczarski, The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 15 June 2020

Did you know?

You might be familiar with the Greek word homos, which means “same.” It is from this word that we get words like homonym, homogeneous, and homophone, all of which have to do with sameness or similarity. What does this have to do with anomaly? Although it’s not obvious, homos is a part of the etymology of anomaly, too. Anomaly is a descendant of the Greek word anōmalos, which means “uneven” or “irregular.” Anōmalos comes from the prefix a- (meaning “not”) and the word homalos (meaning “even”)—and homalos comes from homos.


Lake桑

July 27, 2020 at 01:00PM

又一个周一。

一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

July 27, 2020 at 07:00AM

每日一词:epistolary(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 26, 2020 is:

epistolary • \ih-PIST-uh-lair-ee\  • adjective

1 : of, relating to, or suitable to a letter

2 : contained in or carried on by letters

3 : written in the form of a series of letters

Examples:

“Jonathan Franzen, with whom he had struck up an epistolary friendship, offered to get together that April when he was in Boston.” — D. T. Max, Every Love Story is a Ghost Story: A Life of David Foster Wallace, 2012

“It is an epistolary novel, but spare, as opposed to an 18th-century novel like Clarissa, in which female characters write twice a day. Very few letters are exchanged between the friends; sometimes years pass in between.” — Don Noble, The Tuscaloosa (Alabama) News, 2 May 2020

Did you know?

Epistolary was formed from the noun epistle, which refers to a composition written in the form of a letter to a particular person or group. In its original sense, epistle refers to one of the 21 letters (such as those from the apostle Paul) found in the New Testament. Epistle came to English in the 13th century, via Anglo-French and Latin, from the Greek noun epistolē, meaning “message” or “letter.” Epistolē, in turn, came from the verb epistellein, meaning “to send to” or “to send from.” Epistolary appeared in English four centuries after epistle and can be used to describe something related to or contained in a letter (as in “epistolary greetings”) or composed of letters (as in “an epistolary novel”).


Lake桑

July 26, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:noblesse oblige(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 25, 2020 is:

noblesse oblige • \noh-BLESS-uh-BLEEZH\  • noun

: the obligation of honorable, generous, and responsible behavior associated with high rank or birth

Examples:

“Like many independent schools, Shipley cultivates a sense of noblesse oblige among its students—the notion that part of being educated in a privileged environment requires scholars to give back.” — Alfred Lubrano, The Philadelphia Inquirer, 20 May 2020

“And, unlike the goal of simply becoming fabulously wealthy—which one could also accomplish by winning the lottery or marrying a nonroyal oil magnate—princesshood came with a sense of noblesse oblige. You would be doing it to inspire people. You would be your own act of charity.” — Monica Hesse, The Washington Post, 10 Jan. 2020

Did you know?

In French, noblesse oblige means literally “nobility obligates.” French speakers transformed the phrase into a noun, which English speakers picked up in the 19th century. Then, as now, noblesse oblige referred to the unwritten obligation of people from a noble ancestry to act honorably and generously to others. Later, by extension, it also came to refer to the obligation of anyone who is in a better position than others—due, for example, to high office or celebrity—to act respectably and responsibly.


Lake桑

July 25, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:bowdlerize(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 24, 2020 is:

bowdlerize • \BOHD-ler-ize\  • verb

1 literature : to expurgate (something, such as a book) by omitting or modifying parts considered vulgar

2 : to modify by abridging, simplifying, or distorting in style or content

Examples:

“Certainly, there’s no risk that all art will be bowdlerized into nice stories about people saving puppies, but it’s not wrong to note a fading appetite for antiheroes and bad behavior.” — Jonah E. Bromwich, The New York Times, 12 Mar. 2020

“Under his rule, career scientists are barred from speaking at conferences, websites are bowdlerized, and the respected National Climate Assessment is threatened by political appointees who want to soften its most dire conclusions.” — Renée Loth, The Boston Globe, 25 Nov. 2019

Did you know?

Few editors have achieved the notoriety of Thomas Bowdler. He was trained as a physician, but when illness prevented him from practicing medicine, he turned to warning Europeans about unsanitary conditions at French watering places. Bowdler then carried his quest for purification to literature, and in 1818 he published his Family Shakspeare [sic], a work in which he promised that “those words and expressions are omitted which cannot with propriety be read aloud in a family.” The sanitized volume was popular with the public of the day, but literary critics denounced his modifications of the words of the Bard. Bowdler applied his literary eraser broadly, and within 11 years of his death in 1825 the word bowdlerize was being used to refer to expurgating books or other texts.


Lake桑

July 24, 2020 at 01:00PM

又一个周五!


周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

July 24, 2020 at 12:00PM

每日一词:gyre(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 23, 2020 is:

gyre • \JYRE\  • noun

: a circular or spiral motion or form; especially : a giant circular oceanic surface current

Examples:

Sophia will be focusing her graduate studies on the effects of ocean gyres on North America’s climate.

“The exception has been the Weddell Sea … which retains much of its ice from year to year because of cold winds from the south and a circular current, or gyre, that keeps the ice from drifting into warmer waters that would cause it to melt more.” — Henry Fountain, The New York Times, 17 June 2020

Did you know?

William Butler Yeats opens his 1920 poem, “The Second Coming,” with the following lines: “Turning and turning in the widening gyre / The falcon cannot hear the falconer; / Things fall apart; the center cannot hold; / Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world….” Often found in poetic or literary contexts as an alternative to the more familiar circle or spiral, gyre comes via the Latin gyrus from the Greek gyros, meaning “ring” or “circle.” Gyre is also frequently encountered as an oceanographic term that refers to vast circular systems of ocean currents, such as the North Atlantic Gyre, a system of currents circling clockwise between Europe, Africa, and the Americas. Gyre is also sometimes used of more localized vortices, such as those produced by whirlpools or tornadoes.


Lake桑

July 23, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:requisite(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 22, 2020 is:

requisite • \REK-wuh-zut\  • adjective

: needed for a particular purpose : essential, necessary

Examples:

“Once the application process was formalized, the Institute received nearly two hundred applications from women all across the country; other women interested in applying had been turned away because they didn’t have the requisite qualifications.” — Maggie Doherty, The Equivalents, 2020

“More chile sauce, if you want a vinegary zing, is on the tables, along with the requisite paper towels. As for that stellar taco, it’s made with the same flavorful carnitas with … a drizzle of avocado crema that sets off taste-tingling fireworks.” — The Texas Monthly, 26 Feb. 2020

Did you know?

Acquiring an understanding of where requisite comes from won’t require a formal inquiry. Without question, the quest begins with Latin quaerere, which means “to ask” or “to seek.” That word is ancestor to a number of English words, including acquire, require, inquiry, question, quest, and, of course, requisite. From quaerere came requirere, meaning “to ask again.” Repeated requests can express a need, and the past participle of Latin requirere, which is requisitus, came to mean “needed” or “necessary.” English acquired requisite when it was adopted into Middle English back in the 1400s.


Lake桑

July 22, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:inculcate(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 21, 2020 is:

inculcate • \in-KUL-kayt\  • verb

: to teach and impress by frequent repetitions or admonitions

Examples:

“[Edgar Allan Poe] was in general not a didactic writer; in fact, he criticized stories and poems that sought to inculcate virtue and convey the truth.” — Paul Lewis, The Baltimore Sun, 12 May 2020

“Dogs like routine…. They know when it is time for dinner, time for a walk. And if you have not inculcated these types of routines for them, some dogs will have anxiety when they are alone.” — Dr. Terri Bright, quoted in The Boston Globe, 17 Apr. 2020

Did you know?

Inculcate derives from the past participle of the Latin verb inculcare, meaning “to tread on.” In Latin, inculcare possesses both literal and figurative meanings, referring to either the act of walking over something or to that of impressing something upon the mind, often by way of steady repetition. It is the figurative sense that survives with inculcate, which was first used in English in the 16th century. Inculcare was formed in Latin by combining the prefix in– with calcare, meaning “to trample,” and ultimately derives from the noun calx, “heel.”


Lake桑

July 21, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:derelict(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 20, 2020 is:

derelict • \DAIR-uh-likt\  • adjective

1 : abandoned especially by the owner or occupant; also : run-down

2 : lacking a sense of duty : negligent

Examples:

“On Tuesday, crews … were busy using excavators to tear down derelict buildings on the two sites to make way for future construction.” — Bea Lewis, The New Hampshire Union Leader, 27 May 2020

“But the building suffered additional roof damage in late fall, triggering an emergency demolition that rocked the preservation community and prompted anger against derelict landlords. It also prompted renewed efforts by the city to crack down on absentee and neglectful landlords.” — Jonathan D. Epstein, The Buffalo (New York) News, 7 May 2020

Did you know?

The Latin verb relinquere, meaning “to leave behind,” left behind a few English derivatives, including derelict. Something derelict has been left behind, or at least appears that way. In another sense, someone who is derelict leaves behind or neglects their duties or obligations. Another descendant of relinquere is relinquish, meaning “to leave behind,” “to give up,” or “to release.” Relic is another example of a word that ultimately comes from relinquere. Relics, in the original sense of the term, referred to things treasured for their association with a saint or martyr—that is, objects saints and martyrs had left behind. Relinquere also gives English its name for the containers or shrines which hold relics, reliquary.


Lake桑

July 20, 2020 at 01:00PM

又一个周一。

一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

July 20, 2020 at 07:00AM

每日一词:volte-face(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 19, 2020 is:

volte-face • \vawlt-FAHSS\  • noun

: a reversal in policy : about-face

Examples:

“… I should explain that, some years ago, I was dealt a very severe blow when my friend … announced that she wanted no further contact with me. She and I had been extremely close for more than a year, and there had been no warning of this volte-face. I was bewildered.” — Zoë Heller, What Was She Thinking? Notes on a Scandal, 2003

“After declaring optimistically, ‘I think I have a lot to say that might be interesting to people,’ she did an abrupt volte-face, switching to a low, confessional timbre: ‘Who knows? Who knows, right, what I’m doing? I don’t know. Maybe no one will be interested.'” — Caity Weaver, The New York Times, 28 May 2020

Did you know?

Volte-face came to English by way of French from Italian voltafaccia, a combination of voltare, meaning “to turn,” and faccia, “face.” It has existed as an English noun since at least 1819. The corresponding English phrase “about face” saw use in a number of forms in the decades before that, including military commands such as “right about face” (that is, to turn 180 degrees to the right so as to face in the opposite direction); nevertheless, the standalone noun about-face (as in “After declining, he did an abrupt about-face and accepted the offer”) is about as old as volte-face. Although foot soldiers have been stepping smartly to the command “About face! Forward march!” for centuries, about-face didn’t appear in print as a figurative noun meaning “a reversal of attitude, behavior, or point of view” until the mid-1800s.


Lake桑

July 19, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:jink(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 18, 2020 is:

jink • \JINK\  • verb

: to move quickly or unexpectedly with sudden turns and shifts (as in dodging)

Examples:

“Two fighters immediately launched missiles, and the American aircraft jinked up, then down to lose them.” — Tom Clancy, Red Storm Rising, 1986

“Indeed there have been enough moments where he has jinked away from opponents or worked half a yard with his lightning-quick feet to produce a plethora of YouTube compilations.” — Alex Richards, The Mirror (UK), 2 June 2020

Did you know?

Besides the fact that jink first appears in Scottish English, the exact origins of this shifty little word are unknown. What can be said with certainty is that the word has always expressed a quick or unexpected motion. For instance, in two poems from 1785, Robert Burns uses jink as a verb to indicate both the quick motion of a fiddler’s elbow and the sudden disappearance of a cheat around a corner. In the 20th century, the verb caught on with air force pilots and rugby players, who began using it to describe their elusive maneuvers to dodge opponents and enemies. Jink can also be used as a noun meaning “a quick evasive turn” or, in its plural form, “pranks.” The latter use was likely influenced by the term high jinks, which originally referred in the late 17th century to a Scottish drinking game and later came to refer to horseplay.


Lake桑

July 18, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:mien(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 17, 2020 is:

mien • \MEEN\  • noun

1 : air or bearing especially as expressive of attitude or personality : demeanor

2 : appearance, aspect

Examples:

The minister projected a stern and serious mien from the pulpit, but we found him to be friendly and welcoming when we spoke with him in the social hall after the service.

“The band’s synthetic sounds, automated rhythms and severe haircuts were a pointed contrast with the prevailing … rock music of the time, just as the group’s rigorously Teutonic mien was a reaction to the hegemony of American culture in postwar Germany. Kraftwerk wanted to create its own culture.” — Michael Azerrad, The New York Times, 8 May 2020

Did you know?

Like its synonyms bearing and demeanor, mien means the outward manifestation of personality or attitude. Bearing is the most general, but it often implies characteristic posture, as in “a woman of regal bearing.” Demeanor suggests attitude expressed through outward behavior in the presence of others—for example, “the manager’s professional demeanor.” Mien is a somewhat literary term referring to both bearing and demeanor. “A mien of supreme self-satisfaction” is a typical use. Mien and demeanor are also linked through etymology. Mien arose through the shortening and alteration of the verb demean, which comes from the Anglo-French demener (“to conduct”), a combination of the de- prefix with mener (“to lead”) that is also the root of demeanor. In this case, demean means “to conduct or behave (oneself) usually in a proper manner,” not “to degrade.” That other demean is a distinct word with a different etymology.


Lake桑

July 17, 2020 at 01:00PM

又一个周五!


周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

July 17, 2020 at 12:01PM

每日一词:callous(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 16, 2020 is:

callous • \KAL-us\  • adjective

1 a : being hardened and thickened

b : having calluses

2 a : feeling no emotion

b : feeling or showing no sympathy for others : hard-hearted

Examples:

“[Noël Coward] deliberately made the characters callous and cynical. ‘You can’t sympathise with any of them,’ he said. ‘If there was heart [in the play] it would have been a sad story.'” — Lloyd Evans, The Spectator, 28 Mar. 2020

“Today we have been appalled by the sight of tens of thousands of irresponsible vacationers flocking to the coast, as if this was just another spring break week, with callous disregard for residents’ health and safety.” —  Bruce Jones, quoted on OregonLive.com, 22 Mar. 2020

Did you know?

A callus is a hard, thickened area of skin that develops usually from friction or irritation over time. Such a hardened area often leaves one less sensitive to the touch, so it’s no surprise that the adjective callous, in addition to describing skin that is hard and thick, can also be used as a synonym for harsh or insensitive. Both callus and callous derive via Middle English from Latin. The figurative sense of callous entered English almost 300 years after the literal sense, and Robert Louis Stevenson used it aptly when he wrote, in Treasure Island, “But, indeed, from what I saw, all these buccaneers were as callous as the sea they sailed on.”


Lake桑

July 16, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:indite(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 15, 2020 is:

indite • \in-DYTE\  • verb

1 : make up, compose

2 : to give literary or formal expression to

3 : to put down in writing

Examples:

“Meanwhile, the single gentleman, the Notary, and Mr Garland, repaired to a certain coffee-house, and from that place indited and sent a letter to Miss Sally Brass, requesting her … to favour an unknown friend who wished to consult her….” — Charles Dickens, The Old Curiosity Shop, 1840

“I could not bear the idea of his amusing himself over my secret thoughts and recollections; though, to be sure, he would find little good of himself therein indited….” — Anne Brontë, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, 1848

Did you know?

Indite looks like a misspelling of its homophone indict, meaning “to charge with a crime,” and that’s no mere coincidence. Although the two verbs are distinct in current use, they are in fact related etymologically. Indite is the older of the two; it has been in the English language since the 1300s. Indict, which came about as an alteration of indite, appeared in the 16th century. Ultimately, both terms come from Latin indicere, meaning “to make known formally” or “to proclaim,” which in turn comes from in– plus dīcere, meaning “to talk, speak, or say.”


Lake桑

July 15, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:tutelage(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 14, 2020 is:

tutelage • \TOO-tuh-lij\  • noun

1 a : instruction especially of an individual

b : a guiding influence

2 : the state of being under a guardian or tutor

3 a : an act or process of serving as guardian or protector : guardianship

b : hegemony over a foreign territory: trusteeship

Examples:

Under the tutelage of her high school swim coach, Lynn has greatly improved her times at meets.

“[Jarett Stidham] brings mobility to the position, something the Patriots haven’t had with Tom Brady, and could surprise under the tutelage of future Hall of Fame coach Bill Belichick.” — C. J. Doon, The Baltimore Sun, 30 May 2020

Did you know?

The Latin verb tueri means “to look at” or “to guard.” When tutelage first began appearing in print in the early 1600s, it was used mainly in the protective sense of tueri, as writers described serfs and peasants of earlier eras as being “under the tutelage of their lord.” Over time, however, the word’s meaning shifted away from guardianship and toward instruction. This pattern of meaning can also be seen in the related nouns tutor, which shifted from “a guardian” to “a private teacher,” and tuition, which now typically refers to the cost of instruction but which originally referred to the protection, care, or custody by a parent or guardian over a child or ward.


Lake桑

July 14, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:parsimonious(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 13, 2020 is:

parsimonious • \par-suh-MOH-nee-us\  • adjective

1 : exhibiting or marked by thrift or economy; especially : frugal to the point of stinginess

2 : sparing, restrained

Examples:

“A Monopoly board sat on a makeshift table in the center of the room, with each player’s signature token poised on the Go square: the racing car (Mark), the cannon (Steve), the top hat (me), and a shiny penny (Rob, appropriately enough, since he was known for his parsimonious ways when haggling over deals).” — John Walsh, The Providence Journal, 14 Sept. 2019

“Enter the men: Edmond Rostand (Jason Butler Harner), one of France’s greatest young dramatists; Alphonse Mucha (Matthew Saldivar), the Art Nouveau illustrator of Bernhardt’s gorgeous posters; and Louis (Tony Carlin), a critic so parsimonious with praise I suppose it’s only fair that he’s given no surname.” — Jesse Green, The New York Times, 25 Sept. 2018

Did you know?

English isn’t stingy when it comes to synonyms of parsimonious. Stingy, close, penurious, and miserly are a few terms that, like parsimonious, suggest an unwillingness to share with others. Stingy implies a marked lack of generosity, whereas close suggests keeping a tight grip on one’s money and possessions. Penurious implies frugality that gives an appearance of actual poverty, and miserly suggests avariciousness and a morbid pleasure in hoarding. Parsimonious usually suggests an extreme frugality that borders on stinginess.


Lake桑

July 13, 2020 at 01:00PM

又一个周一。

一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

July 13, 2020 at 07:00AM

每日一词:frisson(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 12, 2020 is:

frisson • \free-SAWN\  • noun

: a brief moment of emotional excitement : shudder, thrill

Examples:

“There’s that frisson of excitement when we get the text or the ring notifying us when dinner has arrived at our doorstep.” — Tom Sietsema, The Washington Post, 10 Apr. 2020

“Will the Oscars be forced to make peace with Netflix and its ilk? Is moviegoing fated to become a quaint, niche pursuit, or one that involves a grave risk? I don’t think I’m the only cinephile experiencing a frisson of dread.” — A. O. Scott, The New York Times, 22 May 2020

Did you know?

“I feel a shiver that’s not from the cold as the band and the crowd go charging through the final notes…. That frisson, that exultant moment….” That’s how writer Robert W. Stock characterized the culmination of a big piece at a concert in 1982. His use of the word shiver is apt given that frisson comes from the French word for “shiver.” Frisson traces to Old French friçon, which in turn derives from frictio, Latin for “friction.” What does friction—normally a heat generator—have to do with thrills and chills? Nothing, actually. The association came about because frictio (which derives from Latin fricare, meaning “to rub”) was once mistakenly taken to be a derivative of frigēre, which means “to be cold.”


Lake桑

July 12, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:confabulate(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 11, 2020 is:

confabulate • \kun-FAB-yuh-layt\  • verb

1 : to talk informally : chat

2 : to hold a discussion : confer

3 : to fill in gaps in memory by fabrication

Examples:

Before accepting my offer to purchase their handmade quilt, Polly and Linda took a moment to confabulate.

“The stories all share a common situation—the two couples in each story get together, get drunk, become hungry and confabulate—though the sharp divergence in the specifics of their conversations would leave readers with plenty to say.” — Nicole Lamy, The New York Times, 30 Oct. 2018

Did you know?

Confabulate is a fabulous word for making fantastic fabrications. Given the similarities in spelling and sound, you might guess that confabulate and fabulous come from the same root, and they do—the Latin fābula, which refers to a conversation or a story. Another fābula descendant that continues to tell tales in English is fable. All three words have long histories in English: fable first appears in writing in the 14th century, and fabulous follows in the 15th. Confabulate is a relative newcomer, appearing at the beginning of the 1600s.


Lake桑

July 11, 2020 at 01:00PM

每日一词:histrionic(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 10, 2020 is:

histrionic • \his-tree-AH-nik\  • adjective

1 : deliberately affected : overly dramatic or emotional : theatrical

2 : of or relating to actors, acting, or the theater

Examples:

“How many water coolers, cocktail parties, and backyard barbecues have you been to where someone has exclaimed, usually in a flourish of histrionic frustration, that they wish they had their own island?” — Carmella DeCaria, The Westchester Magazine, 18 Jan. 2018

“The city’s most extravagant and histrionic event of the fall, Theatre Bizarre, won’t be taking place this October…. Typically taking over Detroit’s Masonic Temple for two weekends just before Halloween, the indoor event includes hot-ticket masquerade balls, and a multi-floor spectacular that includes live music, burlesque, side show acts, food, drink and mandatory costumes—the more outrageous the better.” — Melody Baetens, The Detroit News, 19 May 2020

Did you know?

The term histrionic developed from histrio, Latin for “actor.” Something that is histrionic tends to remind one of the high drama of stage and screen and is often stagy and over-the-top. It especially calls to mind the theatrical form known as the melodrama, where plot and physical action, not characterization, are emphasized. But something that is histrionic isn’t always overdone; the word can also simply refer to an actor or describe something related to the theater. In that sense, it becomes a synonym of thespian.


Lake桑

July 10, 2020 at 01:00PM

又一个周五!


周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

July 10, 2020 at 12:01PM

每日一词:bromide(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 9, 2020 is:

bromide • \BROH-myde\  • noun

1 : a binary compound of bromine with another element or a radical including some (such as potassium bromide) used as sedatives

2 a : a commonplace or tiresome person : bore

b : a commonplace or hackneyed statement or notion

Examples:

“In many ways, he’s an outlier on the self-help circuit. Thomas isn’t selling shortcuts to success or feel-good bromides. He makes achievement sound grueling. His knack is for transforming those he meets—a CEO, an NBA All-Star, a guy manning the desk at a hotel—into the sort of person who loves digging deep and grinding hard.” — Leslie Pariseau, GQ, 28 May 2020

“Currently, Virginia’s leaders are engaged in a tax debate over standard deductions for the middle class. Studying that problem would be a bromide that induces inertia. What is needed is action.” — L. Scott Lingamfelter, The Richmond (Virginia) Times Dispatch, 20 Jan. 2019

Did you know?

After bromine was discovered in the 1820s, chemists could not resist experimenting with the new element. It didn’t take long before they found uses for its compounds, in particular potassium bromide. Potassium bromide started being used as a sedative to treat everything from epilepsy to sleeplessness, and by the 20th century, the word bromide was being used figuratively for anything or anyone that might put one to sleep because of commonness or just plain dullness. Today, bromides are no longer an ingredient in sedative preparations, but we can still feel the effects of figurative bromides as we encounter them in our daily routines.


Lake桑

July 09, 2020 at 01:00PM