每日一词:phantasm(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 31, 2019 is:

phantasm • \FAN-taz-um\  • noun

1 : a product of fantasy: as

a : delusive appearance : illusion

b : ghost, specter

c : a figment of the imagination

2 : a mental representation of a real object

Examples:

“In each maze, you will follow in the footsteps of the Ghostbusters—Peter, Ray, Egon and Winston—as they venture through recreated scenes from the film, including the firehouse, New York Public Library and the Temple of Gozer, as an army of ghoulish spirits, specters and phantasms attack.” — Devoun Cetoute, The Miami Herald, 17 July 2019

“Finally I had to admit defeat: I was never going to turn around my faltering musical career. So at 31 I gave up, abandoning my musical aspirations entirely, to pursue a doctorate in public policy. … After finishing my studies, I became a university professor, a job I enjoyed. But I still thought every day about my beloved first vocation. Even now, I regularly dream that I am onstage, and wake to remember that my childhood aspirations are now only phantasms.” — Arthur C. Brooks, The Atlantic, July 2019

Did you know?

Phantasm is from Middle English fantasme, a borrowing from Anglo-French fantasme, which itself is a derivative of Latin and Greek words—and ultimately the Greek verb phantazein, meaning “to present to the mind.” The Greek verb took shape from phainein, meaning “to show,” and this root appears in several English words that have to do with the way things seem or appear rather than the way they really are. Phantasmagoria and diaphanous are examples. Also from this root are words such as fanciful and fantasy, in which the imagination plays an important part.


Lake桑

October 31, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:respite(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 30, 2019 is:

respite • \RESS-pit\  • noun

1 : a period of temporary delay

2 : an interval of rest or relief

Examples:

The station’s meteorologist had predicted that the bad weather would continue throughout the week without respite.

“Such small, shady public spaces provide a welcome respite from busy street life and enhance the livability of the city.” — David Ross Scheer, The Salt Lake Tribune, 8 Sept. 2019

Did you know?

Respite is first known to have been used at the turn of the 14th century to refer to a delay or extension asked for or granted for a specific reason—to give someone time to deliberate on a proposal, for example. Such a respite offered an opportunity for the kind of consideration inherent in the word’s etymology. Respite traces from the Latin term respectus (also the source of English’s respect), which comes from respicere, a verb with both concrete and abstract meanings: “to turn around to look at” or “to regard.” Within a few decades of its earliest known use, English speakers had granted respite the sense we use most often today—”a welcome break.”


Lake桑

October 30, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:lackadaisical(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 29, 2019 is:

lackadaisical • \lak-uh-DAY-zih-kul\  • adjective

: lacking life, spirit, or zest : languid

Examples:

“What used to be a bar with barely passable food, boring décor and lackadaisical service has a new incarnation. Everything has been improved, starting with its transformation into a lively tavern with a menu of popular comfort foods, as well as choices for more adventurous eaters.” — Marc Bona, Cleveland.com, 6 Apr. 2017

“But it was not that they lost— … but how they lost, mired in lackadaisical play. Jose Iglesias was thrown out at third base trying to advance in a ball on the dirt for an easy out. Blaine Hardy forgot to cover first base. And then … J.D. Martinez caught a fly ball in rightfield and assumed Jason Kipnis would hold at third base.” — Anthony French, The Detroit Free Press, 8 July 2017

Did you know?

Alas, alack, there are times when life seems to be one unfortunate occurrence after another. We’ve all had days when nothing seemed to go right. When folks had one of those days back in the 17th century, they’d cry “Lackaday” to express their sorrow and disappointment. Lackaday was a shortened form of the expression “alack the day.” By the mid-1700s, lackadaisical was being used (coined through the addition of the suffix -ical). The word lackadaisy also was used around that time as an interjection similar to lackaday, and this word, though never as prevalent as lackaday, might have influenced the coinage of lackadaisical.


Lake桑

October 29, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:undulate(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 28, 2019 is:

undulate • \UN-juh-layt\  • verb

1 : to form or move in waves : fluctuate

2 : to rise and fall in volume, pitch, or cadence

3 : to present a wavy appearance

Examples:

“He could hear the muffled fart of a tuba from the German oompah band warming up in Feltman’s beer garden. Beyond the garden was the Ziz coaster, hissing and undulating through the trees with the peculiar sound that gave it its name.” — Kevin Baker, Dreamland, 1999

“Mats of bright green duckweed undulated in the slow current of the La Crosse River, reminding an observer of the shape shifting in a lava lamp.” — Dave Skoloda, The La Crosse (Wisconsin) Tribune, 4 Sept. 2019

Did you know?

Undulate and inundate are word cousins that branch from unda, the Latin word for “wave.” No surprise there. But would you have guessed that abound, surround, and redound are also unda offspring? The connection between unda and these words is easier to see when you learn that at some point in their early histories each of them essentially had the meaning of “to overflow”—a meaning that inundate still carries, along with its “overwhelm” sense.


Lake桑

October 28, 2019 at 01:00PM

又一个周一。

一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

October 28, 2019 at 07:00AM

每日一词:pedagogical(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 27, 2019 is:

pedagogical • \ped-uh-GAH-jih-kul\  • adjective

: of, relating to, or befitting a teacher or education

Examples:

New teachers will be evaluated on pedagogical skills such as lesson planning and classroom management.

“If Americans agree on anything these days, it’s that our schools could be much better, and that internet culture is harming our children. I have a simple proposal to address both problems: high school classes on how to use the internet more effectively. By now the internet has such far-reaching influence that such a pedagogical intervention is called for.” — Tyler Cowen, Bloomberg, 2 July 2019

Did you know?

Pedagogical, which has the somewhat less common variant form pedagogic, was coined in the early 17th century from a Greek adjective of the same meaning. That adjective, paidagōgikos, in turn, derives from the noun paidagōgos, meaning “teacher.” The English word pedagogue (which can simply mean “teacher” but usually suggests one who is particularly pedantic or dull) derives from the same root. Although the words educational and teacher make the grade in most contexts, pedagogical and pedagogue are useful additions to the class.


Lake桑

October 27, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:aerie(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 26, 2019 is:

aerie • \AIR-ee\  • noun

1 : the nest of a bird on a cliff or a mountaintop

2 : an elevated often secluded dwelling, structure, or position

Examples:

“Cradled in the limbs of an ancient (unharmed) oak, the rustic Barn Owl Tree House is a cedar-paneled aerie overlooking the valley.” — Dale Leatherman, The Washingtonian, February 5, 2019

“A quarter-mile uphill from a cul-de-sac…, there is a 30-foot-wide gate beyond which lies another place of mythic proportions …, a 157-acre hilltop aerie with a series of sprawling, manicured fields on an escarpment rising to 1,360 feet in California’s Santa Monica Mountains….” — Alex Bhattacharji, Town & Country, February 2019

Did you know?

English poet John Milton put a variant of aerie to good use in Paradise Lost (1667), writing, “… there the eagle and the stork / On cliffs and cedar tops their eyries build.” But Milton wasn’t the first to use the term, which comes to us via Medieval Latin and Old French and probably traces to an earlier Latin word, ager, meaning “field.” English speakers had been employing aerie as a word for a bird’s nest for more than a century when he penned those words. Eventually, aerie was applied to human dwellings as well as birds’ nests. At first, this sense referred to dwellings nestled high up in mountains or hills. These days, you’re also likely to hear high-rise city apartments or offices referred to as “aeries.”


Lake桑

October 26, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:coruscate(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 25, 2019 is:

coruscate • \KOR-uh-skayt\  • verb

1 : to give off or reflect light in bright beams or flashes : sparkle

2 : to be brilliant or showy in technique or style

Examples:

“You can sense [Mickaline] Thomas’s affection for these ostentatiously fabulous women. They sport towering Afros, floral-print shifts, gold lamé belts…. Lips and eyelids coruscate enough to light the way at night.” — Ariella Budick, The Financial Times, 7 Nov. 2012

“Think of the Amalfi Coast and visions come to mind of verdant hillsides brimming with pastel-color buildings reflected in the coruscating Tyrrhenian Sea.” — Sahar Khan, Vogue, 10 Nov. 2017

Did you know?

To help you gain a flash of recognition next time you see coruscate (or to prompt you when you need a brilliant synonym for sparkle), remember this bit of bright imagery by George Bernard Shaw, describing a centuries-old abbey: “O’er this north door a trace still lingers / Of how a Gothic craftsman’s fingers / Could make stones creep like ivy stems / And tilings coruscate like gems.” Or you could just remember that coruscate developed from Latin coruscare, which means “to flash.” That word also gave us the noun coruscation (“glitter” or “sparkle”) and the adjective coruscant (“shining” or “glittering”).


Lake桑

October 25, 2019 at 01:00PM

又一个周五!


周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

October 25, 2019 at 12:05PM

又一个周五!


周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

October 25, 2019 at 12:01PM

每日一词:Noachian(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 24, 2019 is:

Noachian • \noh-AY-kee-un\  • adjective

1 : of or relating to the patriarch Noah or his time

2 : ancient, antiquated

Examples:

“So you thought the weather of 2009 was a bit on the insane side, with a spring that seemed to last until fall and Noachian levels of rainfall? Not really, according to the Northeast Regional Climate Center in Ithaca, N.Y.” — Thomas J. Morgan, The Providence Journal, 21 Nov. 2009

“Elendil, a Noachian figure, who has held off from the rebellion, and kept ships manned and furnished off the east coast of Númenor, flees before the overwhelming storm of the wrath of the West….” — J. R. R. Tolkien, The Silmarillion, (1977, posthumously)

Did you know?

Students of the Bible know that Noah survived the Great Flood by stowing himself, his family, and male and female specimens of every kind of creature on his Ark. Noachian is derived from the Hebrew name for Noah. Modern contexts find Noachian used in reference to the Great Flood or, more humorously, to describe torrential rainstorms and flooding reminiscent of the Biblical event. It could be said that usage of Noachian spans even beyond planet Earth. Astronomers studying the surface of the planet Mars use Noachian to refer to the epoch between 4.6 and 3.5 billion years ago when that planet’s oldest craters were believed to be formed. This usage is based on Noachis Terra, the name of one of the landmasses of Mars, which translates as “Land of Noah” and was chosen in the 19th century by Italian astronomer Giovanni Schiaparelli.


Lake桑

October 24, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:spoonerism(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 23, 2019 is:

spoonerism • \SPOO-nuh-riz-um\  • noun

: a transposition of usually initial sounds of two or more words (as in tons of soil for sons of toil)

Examples:

“The girlfriend is part of the origin story of Ritt Momney [instead of Mitt Romney]. That was the name Rutter and his friends at East High School gave to the band they formed their junior year. There wasn’t much of a thought process behind the name, a spoonerism of Utah’s junior senator and the czar of the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City.” — Sean P. Means, The Salt Lake Tribune, 14 July 2019

Spoonerisms … occur when the first letter or letters of at least two words are transposed to form a nonsensical or humorous new phrase. My favorite, from childhood, is the usher who offers to ‘sew you to your sheets’ instead of show you to your seats.…” — Caitlin Lovinger, The New York Times, 7 Apr. 2018

Did you know?

Poor William Archibald Spooner! That British clergyman and educator, who lived from 1844 to 1930, often had to speak in public, but he was a nervous man and his tongue frequently got tangled up. He would say things like “a blushing crow” when he meant “a crushing blow.” Spooner’s sound reversals became the stuff of legend—and undoubtedly gave his listeners many a laugh. By the end of the 19th century, his name had inspired the term spoonerism, which lives on to this day.


Lake桑

October 23, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:fiduciary(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 22, 2019 is:

fiduciary • \fuh-DOO-shee-air-ee\  • adjective

: of, relating to, or involving a confidence or trust: such as

a : held or founded in trust or confidence

b : holding in trust

c : depending on public confidence for value or currency

Examples:

“A pet trust can be part of an existing trust or it can be drawn up separately. In a trust, you name the caretaker and you establish a fiduciary obligation for them to care for the pets in the manner and style you choose.” — Charlie Powell, The Moscow-Pullman Daily News (Idaho & Washington), 24 Aug. 2019

“This is an essential piece of insider trading that many people get wrong. The key element of insider trading is not the information. It is the fiduciary relationship breached when an insider uses that information.” — Eric Reed, TheStreet.com, 5 Feb. 2019

Did you know?

Fiduciary relationships often concern money, but the word fiduciary does not, in and of itself, suggest financial matters. Rather, fiduciary applies to any situation in which one person justifiably places confidence and trust in someone else and seeks that person’s help or advice in some matter. The attorney-client relationship is a fiduciary one, for example, because the client trusts the attorney to act in the best interest of the client at all times. Fiduciary can also be used as a noun for the person who acts in a fiduciary capacity, and fiduciarily or fiducially can be called upon if you are in need of an adverb. The words are all faithful to their origin: Latin fīdere, which means “to trust.”


Lake桑

October 22, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:comprise(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 21, 2019 is:

comprise • \kum-PRYZE\  • verb

1 : to be made up of

2 : compose, constitute

3 : to include especially within a particular scope

Examples:

The city developers’ plans include a massive recreational complex that comprises a concert hall, four restaurants, two hotels, and a theater.

“He said the city’s commission, currently comprised of three members but set up for five, is supposed to meet monthly but usually convenes only in times of need, which is rare.” — Kevin Duffy, The Morning Call, 29 Aug. 2019

Did you know?

Comprise has undergone a substantial shift in usage since first appearing in English in the 15th century. For many years, grammarians insisted that the usage of comprise meaning “to be made up of,” as in phrases like “a team comprising nine players,” was correct, and that comprise meaning “to make up,” as in phrases like “the nine players who comprise the team,” was not. This disputed use is most common in the passive construction “to be comprised of,” as in “a team comprised of nine players.” Until relatively recently, this less-favored sense appeared mostly in scientific writing, but current evidence shows that it is now somewhat more common in general use than the word’s other meanings.


Lake桑

October 21, 2019 at 01:00PM

又一个周一。

一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

October 21, 2019 at 07:01AM

每日一词:knackered(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 20, 2019 is:

knackered • \NAK-erd\  • adjective

British : tired, exhausted

Examples:

“Even the most perky 20-something is going to age, have kids and get knackered eventually. And like millions before them they will turn on their TV for respite, rescue, recreation and Ready Steady Cook as their lives unfold.” — Mark Ritson, Marketing Week, 14 Feb. 2019

“There are usually some after parties, but I haven’t made them over the past few years as I’ve been knackered!” — Daniel Ricciardo, quoted in Forbes, 15 Sept. 2017

Did you know?

Knackered is derived from the past participle of knacker, a slang term meaning “to kill,” as well as “to tire, exhaust, or wear out.” The origins of the verb knacker are uncertain, but the word is perhaps related to an older noun knacker, which originally referred to a harness-maker or saddlemaker, and later referred to a buyer of animals no longer able to do farm work (or their carcasses) as well as to a buyer of old structures. The origins of the noun knacker, however, remain obscure. Knackered is used on both sides of the Atlantic but is more common among British speakers.


Lake桑

October 20, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:deke(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 19, 2019 is:

deke • \DEEK\  • verb

: to fake an opponent out of position (as in ice hockey)

Examples:

“[Carl Yastrzemski] led the league in (outfield) assists seven times. He was great at deking the runner into thinking he’d catch the ball or it was over the wall. Most of the assists were on guys trying for doubles.” — Jon Miller, quoted in The San Francisco Chronicle, 13 June 2019

“After taking a pass from Diego Rossi and avoiding a sliding defender, Vela stepped around another defender inside the box, deked keeper Daniel Vega to the ground then dribbled around him….” — Kevin Baxter, The Los Angeles Times, 21 Aug. 2019

Did you know?

Deke originated as a shortened form of decoy. American writer Ernest Hemingway used deke as a noun referring to hunting decoys in a number of his works, including his 1950 novel Across the River and into the Trees (“I offered to put the dekes out with him”). In the 1940s, deke began appearing in ice-hockey contexts in Canadian print sources in reference to the act of faking an opponent out of position—much like how decoy is used for luring one into a trap. Today, deke has scored in many other sports, including baseball, basketball, soccer, and football. It has also occasionally checked its way into more general usage to refer to deceptive or evasive moves or actions.


Lake桑

October 19, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:hobbyhorse(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 18, 2019 is:

hobbyhorse • \HAH-bee-horss\  • noun

1 a : a figure of a horse fastened about the waist in the morris dance

b : a dancer wearing this figure

2 a : a stick having an imitation horse’s head at one end that a child pretends to ride

b : rocking horse

c : a toy horse suspended by springs from a frame

3 a : a topic to which one constantly reverts

b : a pursuit outside one’s regular occupation engaged in especially for relaxation : hobby

Examples:

“Apologies for hopping back on my hobbyhorse, but the lifeblood of every program is recruiting. The first thing Tech’s next coach must do is rustle up pro-style quarterbacks and tight ends because, for 11 years, Tech hasn’t had one.” — Mark Bradley, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, 28 Nov. 2018

“When a man gives himself up to the government of a ruling passion,—or, in other words, when his Hobby-Horse grows headstrong,—farewell cool reason and fair discretion.” — Laurence Sterne, The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, 1759

Did you know?

The hobbyhorse is a toy of yesteryear, dating back to a homespun era predating automobiles. In the 1400s, the word hobby could refer to a real-life horse of small or average size. It soon came to refer to the horse costume worn by a person participating in a morris dance or a burlesque performance, and then, later, to the child’s toy. Another meaning of hobbyhorse was “a favorite pursuit or pastime”; our modern noun hobby (referring to an activity that one does for pleasure when not working) was formed by shortening this word. From pastime, the meaning of hobbyhorse was extended to “a subject to which one repeatedly returns.” The sense is typically encountered as part of such phrases as “get on one’s hobbyhorse” or “ride one’s hobbyhorse.”


Lake桑

October 18, 2019 at 01:00PM

又一个周五!


周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

October 18, 2019 at 12:00PM

每日一词:maunder(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 17, 2019 is:

maunder • \MAWN-der\  • verb

1 : chiefly British : grumble

2 : to wander slowly and idly

3 : to speak indistinctly or disconnectedly

Examples:

The bed-and-breakfast was delightful but we felt a bit captive in the morning as our host maundered on while we hovered at the door, hoping to escape before the morning had passed.

“Listening to [Kenneth Branagh playing Hercule Poirot] feels like chatting with your neighbor over the garden hedge, and it’s all too easy to be distracted by the foliage, I’m afraid, as he maunders on about knife wounds and sleeping potions and missing kimonos.” — Anthony Lane, The New Yorker, 20 Nov. 2017

Did you know?

Maunder looks a lot like meander, and that’s not all the two words have in common—both mean “to wander aimlessly,” either physically or in speech. Some critics have suggested that while meander can describe a person’s verbal and physical rambling, in addition to the wanderings of things like paths and streams, maunder should be limited to wandering words. The problem with that reasoning is that maunder has been used of the physical movements of people since the 18th century, whereas meander didn’t acquire that use until the 19th. These days, meander tends to be the more common choice, although maunder does continue to turn up in both applications.


Lake桑

October 17, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:genial(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 16, 2019 is:

genial • \JEE-nee-ul\  • adjective

1 : favorable to growth or comfort : mild

2 : marked by or freely expressing sympathy or friendliness

3 : displaying or marked by genius

Examples:

“What country seems more sensible? The even discourse, the reflexive politeness, the brilliant yet genial wit, that easy embrace of hellish cold: Canada is a rock. Canada is the neighbor who helps clean out your garage.… Canada is always so … solid.” — S. L. Price, Sports Illustrated, 12 Mar. 2019

“… Sony Pictures confirmed that its upcoming Fred Rogers film will be called ‘A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood.’ The announcement came by way of Twitter…, with the studio again sharing a picture of its star Tom Hanks seated on a trailer stoop in character as the genial children’s programming pioneer—cardigan and all.” — Nardine Saad, The Los Angeles Times, 28 December 2018

Did you know?

Genial derives from the Latin adjective genialis, meaning “connected with marriage.” When genial was first adopted into English in the mid-16th century, it meant “of or relating to marriage,” a sense that is now obsolete. Genialis was formed in Latin by combining the -alis suffix (meaning “of, relating to, or characterized by”) with genius, meaning “a person’s disposition or inclination.” As you may have guessed, Latin genius is the ancestor of the English word genius, meaning “extraordinary intellectual power”—so it’s logical enough that genial eventually developed a sense (possibly influenced by the German word genial) of “marked by very high intelligence.”


Lake桑

October 16, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:belfry(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 15, 2019 is:

belfry • \BEL-free\  • noun

1 : a bell tower; especially : one surmounting or attached to another structure

2 : a room or framework for enclosing a bell

3 : the seat of the intellect : head

Examples:

“The mission stands a little back of the town, and is a large building, or rather collection of buildings, in the centre of which is a high tower, with a belfry of five bells….” — Richard Henry Dana, Jr., Two Years Before the Mast, 1840

“In 1963, a stone steeple over the belfry was removed after settling of the foundation compromised its integrity.” — Stephen Mills, The Times Argus (Barre-Montpelier, Vermont), 12 July 2019

Did you know?

Surprisingly, belfry does not come from bell, and early belfries did not contain bells at all. Belfry comes from the Middle English berfrey, a term for a wooden tower used in medieval sieges. The structure could be rolled up to a fortification wall so that warriors hidden inside could storm the battlements. Over time, the term was applied to other types of shelters and towers, many of which had bells in them. This association of berfrey with bell towers, seems to have influenced the dissimilation of the first r in berfrey to an l, and people began representing this pronunciation in writing with variants such as bellfray, belfrey, and belfry (the last of which has become the standard spelling). On a metaphorical note, someone who has “bats in the belfry” is insane or eccentric. This phrase is responsible for the use of bats for “insane” (as in “Are you completely bats?”) and the occasional use of belfry for “head” (“He’s not quite right in the belfry”).


Lake桑

October 15, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:exoteric(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 14, 2019 is:

exoteric • \ek-suh-TAIR-ik\  • adjective

1 a : suitable to be imparted to the public

b : belonging to the outer or less initiate circle

2 : relating to the outside : external

Examples:

As a specialist writing for a broader audience, Annette faces the challenge of producing an exoteric synthesis of complex information.

“Mainstream Judaism is primarily an exoteric, or outwardly oriented, religion, with a focus on reason, philosophy and ethics. Yet it has always had an esoteric side, expressed in the kabbalah and other mystical teachings.” — Rodger Kamenetz, The San Francisco Chronicle, 9 Dec. 1990

Did you know?

Exoteric derives from Latin exotericus, which is itself from Greek exōterikos, meaning “external,” and ultimately from exō, meaning “outside.” Exō has a number of offspring in English, including exotic, exonerate, exorbitant, and the combining form exo- or ex- (as in exoskeleton and exobiology). The antonym of exoteric is esoteric, meaning “designed for or understood by the specially initiated alone”; it descends from the Greek word for “within,” esō.


Lake桑

October 14, 2019 at 01:00PM

又一个周一。

一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

October 14, 2019 at 07:00AM

每日一词:triskaidekaphobia(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 13, 2019 is:

triskaidekaphobia • \triss-kye-dek-uh-FOH-bee-uh\  • noun

: fear of the number 13

Examples:

“We’ve gathered a list of 13 local theater productions to help you get into that eerie Halloween feeling. Just don’t let triskaidekaphobia—fear of the number 13—stop you from seeing one of these theater productions opening across the state this month.” — Whitney Butters Wilde, The Deseret News, 1 Oct. 2018

“If you’ve got triskaidekaphobia, this event is not for you…. On Friday, April 13, some fans of the horror movie ‘Friday the 13th’ will get a chance to stay overnight at the New Jersey camp where the original film in the slasher series was shot.” — Amy Lieu, The New York Post, 21 Feb. 2018

Did you know?

It’s impossible to say just how or when the number thirteen got its bad reputation. There are a number of theories, of course. Some say it comes from the Last Supper because Jesus was betrayed afterwards by one among the thirteen present. Others trace the source of the superstition back to ancient Hindu beliefs or Norse mythology. But if written references are any indication, the phenomenon isn’t all that old (at least, not among English speakers). Known mention of fear of thirteen in print dates back only to the late 1800s. By circa 1911, however, it was prevalent enough to merit a name, which was formed by attaching the Greek word for “thirteen”—treiskaideka (dropping that first “e”)—to phobia (“fear of”).


Lake桑

October 13, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:wheedle(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 12, 2019 is:

wheedle • \WEE-dul\  • verb

1 : to influence or entice by soft words or flattery

2 : to gain or get by coaxing or flattering

3 : to use soft words or flattery

Examples:

Suzie and Timmy wheedled the babysitter into letting them stay up an hour past their bedtime.

“As we were saying, if you’ve noticed an increase recently in robocalls—those automated calls to your cellphone or landline with come-ons to lower your credit card debt or ploys to wheedle your Social Security number and other information from you—you’re hardly alone.” — editorial, The Daily Herald (Everett, Washington), 2 July 2019

Did you know?

Wheedle has been a part of the English lexicon since the mid-17th century, though no one is quite sure how the word made its way into English. (It has been suggested that the term may have derived from an Old English word that meant “to beg,” but this is far from certain.) Once established in the language, however, wheedle became a favorite of some of the language’s most illustrious writers. Wheedle and its related forms appear in the writings of Wordsworth, Dickens, Kipling, Dryden, Swift, Scott, Tennyson, and Pope, among others.


Lake桑

October 12, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:idée fixe(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 11, 2019 is:

idée fixe • \ee-day-FEEKS\  • noun

: an idea that dominates one’s mind especially for a prolonged period : obsession

Examples:

“When Byrne arrived, he noticed the trees stood close together—far too narrow a space for something with broad shoulders and big feet to make a clean egress. And there, between three and five feet off the ground, snagged in the bark, he spotted the tuft of hair and piece of skin he hoped would bring him one step closer to his idée fixe, the sasquatch itself, a towering hominid of North American lore.” — Reis Thebault, The Washington Post, 6 June 2019

“Though it takes a shocking turn toward the horrific, [Flannery O’Connor’s] ‘Wise Blood’ is in fact a comedy of aberrant humors, in which every character is driven by a compulsive idée fixe.” — David Ansen, Newsweek, 17 Mar. 1980

Did you know?

The term idée fixe is a 19th-century French coinage. French writer Honoré de Balzac used it in his 1830 novella Gobseck to describe an obsessive idea. By 1836, Balzac’s more generalized use of the term had carried over into English, where idée fixe was embraced as a clinical and literary term for a persistent preoccupation or delusional idea that dominates a person’s mind. Although it is still used in both psychology and music, nowadays idée fixe is also applied to milder and more pedestrian obsessions.


Lake桑

October 11, 2019 at 01:00PM

又一个周五!


周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

October 11, 2019 at 12:05PM

又一个周五!


周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

October 11, 2019 at 12:01PM

每日一词:blandish(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 10, 2019 is:

blandish • \BLAN-dish\  • verb

1 : to coax with flattery : cajole

2 : to act or speak in a flattering or coaxing manner

Examples:

“… and all that was left of Pym, it seemed to me, as I wove my lies and blandished, and perjured myself before one kangaroo court after another, was a failing con man tottering on the last legs of his credibility.” — John Le Carré, A Perfect Spy, 1986

“What happened, and what few expected, was the birth of open-access journals that will take just about any paper, for a fee…. They send blandishing emails to scientists, inviting them to publish with them.” — Gina Kolata, The New York Times, 30 Oct. 2017

Did you know?

The word blandish has been a part of the English language since at least the 14th century with virtually no change in its meaning. It ultimately derives from blandus, a Latin word meaning “mild” or “flattering.” One of the earliest known uses of blandish can be found in the sacred writings of Richard Rolle de Hampole, an English hermit and mystic, who cautioned against “the dragon that blandishes with the head and smites with the tail.” Although blandish might not exactly be suggestive of dullness, it was the “mild” sense of blandus that gave us our adjective bland, which has a lesser-known sense meaning “smooth and soothing in manner or quality.”


Lake桑

October 10, 2019 at 01:00PM