每日一词:brackish(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 31, 2019 is:

brackish • \BRACK-ish\  • adjective

1 : somewhat salty

2 a : not appealing to the taste

b : repulsive

Examples:

The mangrove swamp is home to many species of plants and animals that thrive in brackish water.

“For decades, the Battleship Texas has rested in the shallow, brackish waters of the Houston Ship Channel, slowly decaying. While tourists marvel at the last surviving dreadnought that fought in two world wars, beneath the surface a system of pumps pushes out water seeping through the ship’s corroded hull.” — Nick Powell, The Houston Chronicle, 26 June 2019

Did you know?

When the word brackish first appeared in English in the 1500s, it simply meant “salty,” as did its Dutch parent brac. Then, as now, brackish water could simply be a mixture of saltwater and freshwater. Since that time, however, brackish has developed the additional meanings of “unpalatable” or “distasteful”—presumably because of the undrinkable quality of saltwater. “The brackish water that we drink / Creeps with a loathsome slime, / And the bitter bread they weigh in scales / Is full of chalk and lime.” As this use from Oscar Wilde’s “Ballad of Reading Gaol” illustrates, brackish water can also include things other than salt that make it unpleasant to drink.


Lake桑

August 31, 2019 at 01:00PM

又一个周五!


周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

August 30, 2019 at 12:05PM

每日一词:martinet(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 30, 2019 is:

martinet • \mar-tuh-NET\  • noun

1 : a strict disciplinarian

2 : a person who stresses a rigid adherence to the details of forms and methods

Examples:

“Her father was a diet-and-exercise martinet, imposing a strict regimen on her as a condition for receiving an allowance.” — Michael Upchurch, The Boston Globe, 20 Aug. 2017

“Topping them all, though, has to be Gen. William Westmoreland. Tall. Ramrod straight. Grim visage. He just had that look, and he … is the subject of endless debate. Was he a martinet who never really understood his war and cost America a chance at victory, or was he perhaps something more complex?” — Andrew Wiest and Susannah Ural, The New York Times, 9 Oct. 2017

Did you know?

When France’s King Louis XIV appointed Lieutenant Colonel Jean Martinet to be inspector general of the infantry in the late 17th century, he made a wise choice. As a drillmaster, Martinet trained his troops to advance into battle in precise linear formations and to fire in volleys only upon command, thus making the most effective use of inaccurate muskets—and making the French army one of the best on the continent. He also gave English a new word. Martinet has been used synonymously with “strict disciplinarian” since the early 18th century.


Lake桑

August 30, 2019 at 01:00PM

又一个周五!


周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

August 30, 2019 at 12:00PM

每日一词:augur(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 29, 2019 is:

augur • \AW-gur\  • verb

1 : to foretell especially from omens

2 : to give promise of : presage

Examples:

“The new discovery should provide insight into the elusive origins of the strange bright signals, and augurs a dawning era in which they will be found and studied by the thousands.” — Nola Taylor Redd, Scientific American, 13 Aug. 2018

“Still, combined with Denver’s lack of postseason experience, its recent struggles against top competition doesn’t augur well for a deep playoff run.” — Grant Hughes, Bleacher Report, 5 Apr. 2019

Did you know?

Auguring is what augurs did in ancient Rome. Augurs were official diviners whose function it was not to foretell the future, but to divine whether the gods approved of a proposed undertaking, such as a military move. They did so by various means, among them observing the behavior of birds and examining the entrails of sacrificed animals. Nowadays, the foretell sense of the verb is often used with an adverb, such as well. Augur comes from Latin and is related to the Latin verb augēre, meaning “to increase.”


Lake桑

August 29, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:irascible(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 28, 2019 is:

irascible • \ir-RASS-uh-bul\  • adjective

: marked by hot temper and easily provoked anger

Examples:

That tidy little house belongs to an irascible crank who never has a kind word for any of his neighbors.

“Working with Adam Baldwin, best known as the irascible mercenary Jayne in Firefly and Serenity and the gruff but lovable John Casey on Chuck, was another bonus.” — Tim Clodfelter, The News & Record (Greensboro, North Carolina), 9 June 2019

Did you know?

If you try to take apart irascible in the same manner as irrational, irresistible, or irresponsible, you might find yourself wondering what ascible means—but that’s not how irascible came to be. The key to the meaning of irascible isn’t the negative prefix ir- (which is a variant of the prefix in- that is used before words beginning with “r”), but the Latin noun ira, meaning “anger.” From ira, which is also the root of irate and ire, came the Latin verb irasci (“to become angry”) and the related adjective irascibilis, the latter of which led to the French irascible. English speakers borrowed the word from French in the 16th century.


Lake桑

August 28, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:desuetude(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 27, 2019 is:

desuetude • \DESS-wih-tood\  • noun

: discontinuance from use or exercise : disuse

Examples:

The old bridge, which fell into desuetude after the railroad was shut down, has recently been opened as a pedestrian walkway.

“It has been 15 years since Mr. Klein and his partners paid $18 million for the Sunset Tower, a faded Art Deco relic on a stretch of Sunset Strip that, although now booming, had fallen into funky desuetude. Against most odds and all prevailing wisdom, he soon established it and its Tower Bar restaurant as essential landmarks of the new Hollywood.” — Guy Trebay, The New York Times, 23 Feb. 2019

Did you know?

Desuetude must be closely related to disuse, right? Wrong. Despite the similarities between them, desuetude and disuse derive from two different Latin verbs. Desuetude comes from suescere, a word that means “to become accustomed” (suescere also gave us the word custom). Disuse descends from uti, which means “to use.” (That Latin word also gave us use and utility.) Although less common, desuetude hasn’t fallen into desuetude yet, and it was put to good use in the past, as in the 17th-century writings of Scottish Quaker Robert Barclay, who wrote, “The weighty Truths of God were neglected, and, as it were, went into Desuetude.”


Lake桑

August 27, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:wangle(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 26, 2019 is:

wangle • \WANG-gul\  • verb

1 : to resort to trickery

2 : to adjust or manipulate for personal or fraudulent ends

3 : to make or get by devious means : finagle

Examples:

“He wangled an invitation to a White House Christmas party, where he and his wife posed for a photo with then-President Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama.” — Barbara Demick and Victoria Kim, The Los Angeles Times, 16 May 2019

“‘Our Mayor is the most appealing man I know,’ [Franklin D. Roosevelt] said on one occasion. ‘He comes to Washington and tells me a sad story. The tears run down my cheeks and the tears run down his cheeks and the next thing I know, he has wangled another $50 million out of me.'” — Mason B. Williams, City of Ambition, 2013

Did you know?

Wangle, a verb of uncertain origin, has been used in its newest sense, “to obtain by sly methods,” since at least the early 20th century. Occasionally, one sees wrangle used similarly, as in “wrangle a huge salary,” but more typically it means “to argue or engage in controversy.” Did the “obtain” sense of wrangle evolve through confusion with wangle? Not exactly. Wrangle was used with the meaning “to obtain by arguing or bargaining” since the early 17th century, long before wangle appeared in the language. The sense had all but disappeared until recent decades, however, and its revival may very well have been influenced by wangle. The “obtain” sense of wangle is currently more common than that use of wrangle, but both are considered standard.


Lake桑

August 26, 2019 at 01:00PM

又一个周一。

一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

August 26, 2019 at 07:00AM

每日一词:kludge(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 25, 2019 is:

kludge • \KLOOJ\  • noun

: a haphazard or makeshift solution to a problem and especially to a computer or programming problem

Examples:

Andy knocked out a hasty kludge to circumvent the buggy code until a more robust solution could be developed.

“When the theatre was built in and opened in 1920, there were no concessions of any kind. Everything that we’ve done to accommodate modern audiences was a kludge in various ways.” — Curtis McCrary, quoted in The Tucson (Arizona) Weekly, 25 Oct. 2018

Did you know?

The first recorded use of the word kludge is attributed to Jackson W. Granholm, who defined the word in a 1962 issue of the magazine Datamation as “an ill-assorted collection of poorly-matching parts, forming a distressing whole.” He further explained that it was derived from the German word klug, meaning “smart” or “witty.” Why Granholm included a d in his spelling is not known. What we do know is that speakers of American English have agreed to disregard it in pronunciation, making the vowel pronunciation of kludge reflective of the pronunciation of German klug (\KLOOK\ ). We can also tell you that not everyone agrees with Granholm on the “d” matter: the spelling kluge is also popularly used.


Lake桑

August 25, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:sporadic(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 24, 2019 is:

sporadic • \spuh-RAD-ik\  • adjective

: occurring occasionally, singly, or in irregular or random instances

Examples:

The team’s regular meetings became sporadic over the summer months, when at some points up to half of its members were on vacation.

“Continuous permafrost hugs the Hudson Bay coast and spreads inland about 75 kilometres before becoming discontinuous and sporadic. Like peat, permafrost is an effective storehouse of greenhouse gases.” — Kenyon Wallace, The Toronto Star, 27 May 2019

Did you know?

Sporadic describes the distribution of something across space or time that is not frequent enough to fill an area or period, often in scattered instances or isolated outbursts (as in “sporadic applause”). The word comes from Medieval Latin sporadicus, which is itself derived from Greek sporadēn, meaning “here and there.” It is also related to the Greek verb speirein (“to sow”), the ancestor from which we get our word spore (the reproductive cell of a fungus, microorganism, or some plants), hinting at the seeming scattered nature by which such cells distribute and germinate.


Lake桑

August 24, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:excursion(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 23, 2019 is:

excursion • \ik-SKER-zhun\  • noun

1 a : a going out or forth : expedition

b (1) : a usually brief pleasure trip

(2) : a trip at special reduced rates

2 : deviation from a direct, definite, or proper course; especially : digression

3 : a movement outward and back or from a mean position or axis; also : the distance traversed : amplitude

Examples:

Lewis Carroll’s Through The Looking Glass is an excursion into a fantastical world where nothing is what it seems to be, and everything appears to be what it is not.

“Every morning for 10 years, Joey Gamez has hopped on a boat to take customers of his Golden State Sportfishing business on a San Francisco Bay excursion, a hobby-turned-business for the 42-year-old.” — Alejandra Reyes-Velarde, The Los Angeles Times, 15 July 2019

Did you know?

In Latin, the prefix ex- means “out of” and the verb currere means “to run.” When the two are put together, they form the verb excurrere, literally “to run out” or “to extend.” Excurrere gave rise not only to excursion but also to excurrent (an adjective for things having channels or currents that run outward) and excursus (meaning “an appendix or digression that contains further exposition of some point or topic”). Other words deriving from currere include corridor, curriculum, and among newer words, parkour.


Lake桑

August 23, 2019 at 01:00PM

又一个周五!


周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

August 23, 2019 at 12:00PM

每日一词:chivy(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 22, 2019 is:

chivy • \CHIV-ee\  • verb

1 : to tease or annoy with persistent petty attacks

2 : to move or obtain by small maneuvers

Examples:

Marielle watched her little brother as he chivied an olive from the jar with his fingers.

“To encounter Hemingway as an adult was to be faced with a man whose appetite for supposedly masculine pursuits was so assiduously cultivated as to border on parody…. He would routinely chivy his friends into the ring in order to engage in tests of strength.” — Matthew Adams, The Washington Post, 17 May 2017

Did you know?

Chivy, which is also spelled chivvy, became established in our language in the 19th century and, at first, meant “to harass or chase.” Early usage examples are of people chivying a chicken around to catch it and of a person chivying around food that is frying. The verb comes from a British noun chivy meaning “chase” or “hunt.” That chivy is believed to be derived from Chevy Chase—a term for “chase” or “confusion” that is taken from the name of a ballad describing the 1388 battle of Otterburn between the Scottish and English. (A chase in this context is an unenclosed tract of land that is used as a game preserve.)


Lake桑

August 22, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:misnomer(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 21, 2019 is:

misnomer • \miss-NOH-mer\  • noun

1 : the misnaming of a person in a legal instrument

2 a : a use of a wrong or inappropriate name

b : a wrong name or inappropriate designation

Examples:

“When you see flashes along the horizon on a summer night, it could be lightning within a storm that’s more than 100 miles away. ‘Heat lightning‘ is a misnomer—they’re just ordinary strikes that lack thunder and appear diffuse when witnessed from a long distance.” — John Boyer, The Richmond (Virginia) Times Dispatch, 27 June 2019

“Ten candidates will debate for two hours each night Wednesday and Thursday—although ‘debate’ is something of a misnomer, in the LincolnDouglas sense of the word, given the time constraints and limited ability for great depth or lengthy engagement.” — Mark Z. Barabak and Michael Finnegan, The Los Angeles Times, 25 June 2019

Did you know?

What’s in a name? Well, in some cases, a name will contain an error, a misunderstanding, or a mislabeling. Historians have long noted that the Holy Roman Empire was neither holy, Roman, nor an empire. The Battle of Bunker Hill was actually fought on Breed’s Hill. And the Pennsylvania Dutch are in fact of German ancestry. For such cases, we have the term misnomer, which comes from the Anglo-French verb mesnomer (“to misname”) and ultimately has its roots in nomen, the Latin word for “name.”


Lake桑

August 21, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:ethereal(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 20, 2019 is:

ethereal • \ih-THEER-ee-ul\  • adjective

1 a : of or relating to the regions beyond the earth

b : celestial, heavenly

c : unworldly, spiritual

2 a : lacking material substance : immaterial, intangible

b : marked by unusual delicacy or refinement

c : suggesting the heavens or heaven

3 : relating to, containing, or resembling a chemical ether

Examples:

“Like Howe’s Omniverse, van Herpen’s finale piece used aluminum and stainless steel on the skeleton, covering it with a thin layer of feathers that ruffled, turning as if graced with gust of wind. The penultimate look channeled the same ethereal vibe, featuring laser-cut strips of fabric that give the appearance of pulsating angel wings.” — Barry Samaha, Surface, 2 July 2019

Colored Everything has an air of maturity about it. … What you’ll hear is seemingly endless layers of airy, ethereal sound that makes you wonder what kinds of instruments are being used to create such sounds.” — Jon Bodell, The Concord (New Hampshire) Insider, 18 June 2019

Did you know?

If you’re burning to know the history of ethereal, you’re in the right spirit to fully understand that word’s etymology. The ancient Greeks believed that the Earth was composed of earth, air, fire, and water, but that the heavens and its denizens were made of a purer, less tangible substance known as either ether or quintessence. Ether was often described as an invisible light or fire, and its name derives from the Greek aithein, a verb meaning “to ignite” or “to blaze.” When ethereal, the adjectival kin of ether, debuted in English in the 1500s, it referred to regions beyond the Earth or anything that seemed to originate from there.


Lake桑

August 20, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:brandish(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 19, 2019 is:

brandish • \BRAN-dish\  • verb

1 : to shake or wave (something, such as a weapon) menacingly

2 : to exhibit in an ostentatious or aggressive manner

Examples:

Michael appeared before the town council brandishing a petition signed by 500 people asking the town to increase funding for the public skate park.

“Our plates of crisply battered cod, chips and mushy peas and our drinks arrived and we set to. Atticus ate with his fingers…. ‘Do you know how to use a knife and fork?’ I said to him, purely out of interest. He said he did know and he picked them up and brandished them at me to prove it. The fork was in his right hand, the knife in his left. ‘Bravo,’ I said.” — Jeremy Clarke, The Spectator, 21 July 2018

Did you know?

Often when we encounter the word brandish in print, it is soon followed by a word for a weapon, such as knife or handgun. That’s appropriate given the word’s etymology: it is a descendant of the Middle English braundisshen, which derives, via brandiss- (a stem of the Anglo-French brandir), from brant, braund, meaning “sword.” Nowadays you can brandish things other than weapons, however. The figurative usage of brandish rose alongside its earliest literal usage in the 14th century. When you brandish something that isn’t a weapon (such as a sign), you are in effect waving it in someone’s face so that it cannot be overlooked.


Lake桑

August 19, 2019 at 01:00PM

又一个周一。

一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

August 19, 2019 at 07:00AM

每日一词:hiatus(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 18, 2019 is:

hiatus • \hye-AY-tus\  • noun

1 a : a break in or as if in a material object : gap

b biology : a gap or passage in an anatomical part or organ

2 a : an interruption in time or continuity : break; especially : a period when something (as a program or activity) is suspended or interrupted

b : the occurrence of two vowel sounds without pause or intervening consonantal sound

Examples:

“The bus service will run from Dec. 3 to Dec. 21 before going on hiatus for the holidays. Regular service will resume on Jan. 7.” — Alison Brownlee, The Huntsville Forester, November 27, 2012

“It’s a new era for pop/rockstar Adam Lambert. After a four-year hiatus from his solo career, during which he became the new frontman for Queen, the singer returned earlier this year with two new singles and the announcement of his upcoming fourth studio album Velvet.” — Stephen Daw, Billboard.com, 19 June 2019

Did you know?

Hiatus comes from hiare, a Latin verb meaning “to gape” or “to yawn,” and first appeared in English in the middle of the 16th century. Originally, the word referred to a gap or opening in something, such as a cave opening in a cliff. In the 18th century, British novelist Laurence Sterne used the word humorously in his novel Tristram Shandy, writing of “the hiatus in Phutatorius’s breeches.” These days, hiatus is usually used in a temporal sense to refer to a pause or interruption (as in a song), or a period during which an activity is temporarily suspended (such as a hiatus from teaching).


Lake桑

August 18, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:tortuous(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 17, 2019 is:

tortuous • \TOR-chuh-wus\  • adjective

1 : marked by repeated twists, bends, or turns : winding

2 a : marked by devious or indirect tactics : crooked, tricky

b : circuitous, involved

Examples:

“What a cast! A tsunami of lawyers, such as William Evarts, Benjamin Butler and others swept over Washington with a vengeance, launching long-winded speeches—one lasted 14 hours—and tortuous explanations of policies.” — Sam Coale, The Providence Journal, 23 May 2019

“Introduced to the Tour in 2012, the Planche des Belles Filles ascent immediately became a classic. Set up in the Vosges mountains, it is steep, tortuous and brutal, featuring a 20 percent gradient at the top.” — Samuel Petrequin, The Associated Press, 1 July 2019

Did you know?

Be careful not to confuse tortuous with torturous. These two words are relatives—both ultimately come from the Latin verb torquere, which means “to twist,” “to wind,” or “to wrench”—but tortuous means “winding” or “crooked,” whereas torturous means “painfully unpleasant.” Something tortuous (such as a twisting mountain road) might also be torturous (if, for example, you have to ride up that road on a bicycle), but that doesn’t make these words synonyms. The twists and turns that mark a tortuous thing can be literal (“a tortuous path” or “a tortuous river”) or figurative (“a tortuous argument” or “a tortuous explanation”), but you should consider choosing a different descriptive term if no implication of winding or crookedness is present.


Lake桑

August 17, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:satiate(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 16, 2019 is:

satiate • \SAY-shee-ayt\  • verb

: to satisfy (a need, a desire, etc.) fully or to excess

Examples:

After eating three pieces of pie and one of cake at the potluck, Jamie’s sweet tooth was finally satiated.

“While the battles between Shazam and his arch enemy Thaddeus Sivana … will satiate superhero fans, the emotional center of the movie is the Philadelphia foster family that embraces Billy.” — Brian Truitt, USA Today, 3 Apr. 2019

Did you know?

Satiate, sate, surfeit, cloy, pall, glut, and gorge all mean to fill to repletion. Satiate and sate sometimes imply only complete satisfaction but more often suggest repletion that has destroyed interest or desire, as in “Years of globe-trotting had satiated their interest in travel” and “Readers were sated with sensationalistic stories.” Surfeit implies a nauseating repletion, as in “They surfeited themselves with junk food,” while cloy stresses the disgust or boredom resulting from such surfeiting, “The strong scent of the flowers cloyed her.” Pall emphasizes the loss of ability to stimulate interest or appetite—for example, “A life of leisure eventually began to pall.” Glut implies excess in feeding or supplying, as in “a market glutted with diet books,” and gorge suggests glutting to the point of bursting or choking, “They gorged themselves with chocolate.”


Lake桑

August 16, 2019 at 01:00PM

又一个周五!


周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

August 16, 2019 at 12:00PM

每日一词:miscible(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 15, 2019 is:

miscible • \MISS-uh-bul\  • adjective

: capable of being mixed; specifically : capable of mixing in any ratio without separation of two phases

Examples:

Oil and water are not miscible—if you pour oil in a glass of water, it will float to the top. 

“Although the alkalized cocoa was not completely soluble in milk or water, it was more miscible than any other cocoa product, blending more evenly in solution….” — Deborah Cadbury, Chocolate Wars, 2010

Did you know?

Miscible isn’t simply a lesser-known synonym of mixable—it’s also a cousin. It comes to us from the Medieval Latin adjective miscibilis, which has the same meaning as miscible and which derives, in turn, from Latin miscēre, meaning “to mix.” Miscēre is also the ultimate source of our mix; its past participle mixtus (meaning “mixed”) spawned mixte in Anglo-French and Middle English, and mix came about as a back-formation of mixte. The suffix -able gives us mixable, thereby completing its link to miscible. Miscible turns up most frequently in scientific discussions where it is used especially to describe fluids that don’t separate when they are combined.


Lake桑

August 15, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:garniture(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 14, 2019 is:

garniture • \GAHR-nih-cher\  • noun

1 : embellishment, trimming

2 : a set of decorative objects (such as vases, urns, or clocks)

Examples:

“Above the fireplace: a scene of a cow jumping over the moon, in an elaborate gilt frame. On the mantle below, we see a clock…, flanked by garniture sturdy enough to be a murder weapon out of Agatha Christie.” — Rumaan Alam, Slate, 23 Aug. 2016

“Once upon a time, this was probably one of a pair of vases that comprised a garniture set used to decorate a Victorian mantel. Its mate has vanished into the lost and found of history, but this one with its superb craftsmanship remains a thing of beauty.” — Helaine Fendelman and Joe Rosson, The New Hampshire Union Leader, 29 June 2019

Did you know?

In Middle French, garniture meant “accessory.” It is an alteration of the Old French noun garneture, which is derived from the verb garnir, which meant “to equip, trim, or decorate.” In fact, an Anglo-French stem of garnir, garniss-, is the source of the English verb garnish, which in its senses of “to decorate” and “to embellish” shares a similar relationship to garniture that the verb furnish shares with furniture. Furnish comes from the Anglo-French furniss-, a stem of the verb furnir or fournir, which also gave rise to the Middle French fourniture, the source of the English furniture.


Lake桑

August 14, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:smite(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 13, 2019 is:

smite • \SMYTE\  • verb

1 : to strike sharply or heavily especially with the hand or an implement held in the hand

2 a : to kill or severely injure by so striking

b : to attack or afflict suddenly and injuriously

3 : to cause to strike

4 : to affect as if by striking

5 : captivate, take

Examples:

The cartoon’s villain was, as tradition would have it, smote by an anvil dropping mysteriously from the sky.

“Down the street, Teresa Benner’s 1963, 23-window Volkswagen van was also turning heads. She bought it recently when it came up at a Barrett-Jackson auction in Arizona. She was smitten at first sight.” — Joel Mills, The Lewiston (Idaho) Morning Tribune, 23 June 2019

Did you know?

Today’s word has been part of the English language for a very long time; the earliest documented use in print dates to the 12th century. Smite can be traced back to the Old English smītan, meaning “to smear or defile.” Smītan is akin to the Scottish word smit, meaning “to stain, contaminate, or infect,” as well as to the Old High German bismīzan, “to defile.” In addition to its “strike” and “attack” senses, smite has a softer side. As of the mid-17th century, it can mean “to captivate or take”—a sense that is frequently used in the past participle in such contexts as “smitten by her beauty” or “smitten with him” (meaning “in love with him”). Its past tense is smote.


Lake桑

August 13, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:plaintive(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 12, 2019 is:

plaintive • \PLAYN-tiv\  • adjective

: expressive of suffering or woe : melancholy

Examples:

“Dean Nicholson was pedaling up a hill in Bosnia … when he heard a plaintive meow. He looked over his shoulder. In the lambent December light, he saw a gray-and-white kitten chasing him up the incline.” — Isaac Stanley-Becker, The Philadelphia Inquirer, 4 Apr. 2019

“[Stevie] Wonder did perform a plaintive cover of the John Lennon classic ‘Imagine’ for his penultimate number—a statement piece that he’s incorporated on his tours since the 1990s, and which he noted as being ‘still relevant,’ despite originally coming out in 1971.” — Mara Reinstein, Billboard.com, 25 June 2019

Did you know?

Like its relative plangent, plaintive is often used to describe sad sounds. “A plaintive wail,” for example, is a common use. Plaintive and plangent (along with relatives plaintiff and complain) ultimately derive from the Latin verb plangere, meaning “to strike,” “to beat one’s breast,” or “to lament.” This Latin verb led to plaint, an Anglo-French word (and now also an English word) meaning “lamentation.” Plaint is the root of Middle English plaintif (meaning “lamenting” or “complaining”), which gave rise to plaintive as well as the noun plaintiff.


Lake桑

August 12, 2019 at 01:00PM

又一个周一。

一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

August 12, 2019 at 07:00AM

每日一词:démarche(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 11, 2019 is:

démarche • \day-MARSH\  • noun

1 a : a course of action : maneuver

b : a diplomatic or political initiative or maneuver

2 : a petition or protest presented through diplomatic channels

Examples:

“On Feb. 23, less than a week after the U.S. démarche to the Cuban government, DeLaurentis accompanied two visiting U.S. senators … to see President Raúl Castro at the Palace of the Revolution.” — Tim Golden and Sebastian Rotella, ProPublica, 14 Feb. 2018

“European Union foreign ministers … will also issue a demarche—a formal diplomatic protest note—to Moscow as early as next week over Russia’s continued detention of 24 Ukrainian sailors captured in the November incident, they added.” — The Washington Post, 25 Jan. 2019

Did you know?

When it comes to international diplomacy, the French may not always have the last word—but they have quite a few, many of which they’ve shared with English. We began using démarche—which in French can mean “gait,” “walk,” or “action,” among other things—in the 17th century. It was first used generally in the sense of “a maneuver,” and before long it developed a specific use in the world of diplomacy. Some of the other diplomacy-related words we use that come from French include attaché, chargé d’affaires, communiqué, détente, and agrément—not to mention the words diplomacy and diplomat themselves.


Lake桑

August 11, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:balkanize(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 10, 2019 is:

balkanize • \BAWL-kuh-nyze\  • verb

1 : to break up (a region, a group, etc.) into smaller and often hostile units

2 : divide, compartmentalize

Examples:

“Tech companies and civil rights advocates warn that the increasing push by nations to create their own internet rules will Balkanize the internet and potentially lead to privacy violations and the stifling of political dissent.” — Cecilia Kang and Katie Benner, The New York Times, 7 Jan. 2017

“Historical scholarship had become Balkanized into dozens of subfields and specialized methodologies, many of them virtually inaccessible to lay readers or even to specialists in other subfields.” — James M. McPherson, The New York Times Book Review, 19 Sept. 1999

Did you know?

The Balkan Peninsula of southeastern Europe is lapped by the Adriatic Sea in the west and the Black Sea in the east. It is named for the Balkan Mountains, a mountain range which extends from its border with Serbia to the Black Sea. (Balkan derives from the Ottoman Turkish balḳān, meaning “wooded mountain or mountain range.”) The Balkan States are commonly characterized as comprising Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Kosovo, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Romania, Serbia, and Slovenia, with mainland portions of Greece and the European portion of Turkey often being included as well. The English word balkanize (often written with a capital B) is the lexical offspring of geography and history: the decline of the Ottoman Empire in the 18th century led to a series of revolts that accelerated the fracturing of the region into a number of smaller states whose unstable coexistence led to violence that came to a head in World War I. Since the early 20th century, balkanize and its related noun, balkanization, have come to refer to the kind of divisive action that can weaken countries or groups, as well as other things.


Lake桑

August 10, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:omnium-gatherum(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 9, 2019 is:

omnium-gatherum • \ahm-nee-um-GA-thuh-rum\  • noun

: a miscellaneous collection (as of things or persons)

Examples:

“Muldoon’s Picnic—the critically acclaimed omnium-gatherum of music, storytelling, poetry, and more—has become a staple of New York’s cultural diet.” — BroadwayWorld.com, 4 Sept. 2018

“In his diary, a small, haphazardly kept omnium-gatherum, Arlen set down axioms, vocabulary words, and quotes from a wide-ranging reading list—Marcus Aurelius, Aristotle, Santayana, Nietzsche.” — John Lahr, The New Yorker, 19 Sept. 2005

Did you know?

English abounds in Latin phrases. They roll off the learned tongue like peas off a fork: tabula rasa, ab ovo, a posteriori, deus ex machina, ex cathedra, mea culpa, terra firma, vox populi, ad hominem, sub rosa. Omnium-gatherum belongs on that list too, right? Not exactly. Omnium-gatherum sounds like Latin, and indeed omnium (the genitive plural of Latin omnis, meaning “all”) is the real thing. But gatherum is simply English gather with -um tacked on to give it a classical ring. We’re not suggesting, however, that the phrase is anything less than literate. After all, the first person known to have used it was John Croke, a lawyer who was educated at Eton and Cambridge in the 16th century.


Lake桑

August 09, 2019 at 01:00PM