每日一词:brackish(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 31, 2019 is:

brackish • \BRACK-ish\  • adjective

1 : somewhat salty

2 a : not appealing to the taste

b : repulsive

Examples:

The mangrove swamp is home to many species of plants and animals that thrive in brackish water.

“For decades, the Battleship Texas has rested in the shallow, brackish waters of the Houston Ship Channel, slowly decaying. While tourists marvel at the last surviving dreadnought that fought in two world wars, beneath the surface a system of pumps pushes out water seeping through the ship’s corroded hull.” — Nick Powell, The Houston Chronicle, 26 June 2019

Did you know?

When the word brackish first appeared in English in the 1500s, it simply meant “salty,” as did its Dutch parent brac. Then, as now, brackish water could simply be a mixture of saltwater and freshwater. Since that time, however, brackish has developed the additional meanings of “unpalatable” or “distasteful”—presumably because of the undrinkable quality of saltwater. “The brackish water that we drink / Creeps with a loathsome slime, / And the bitter bread they weigh in scales / Is full of chalk and lime.” As this use from Oscar Wilde’s “Ballad of Reading Gaol” illustrates, brackish water can also include things other than salt that make it unpleasant to drink.


Lake桑

August 31, 2019 at 01:00PM

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又一个周五!


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Lake桑

August 30, 2019 at 12:05PM

每日一词:martinet(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 30, 2019 is:

martinet • \mar-tuh-NET\  • noun

1 : a strict disciplinarian

2 : a person who stresses a rigid adherence to the details of forms and methods

Examples:

“Her father was a diet-and-exercise martinet, imposing a strict regimen on her as a condition for receiving an allowance.” — Michael Upchurch, The Boston Globe, 20 Aug. 2017

“Topping them all, though, has to be Gen. William Westmoreland. Tall. Ramrod straight. Grim visage. He just had that look, and he … is the subject of endless debate. Was he a martinet who never really understood his war and cost America a chance at victory, or was he perhaps something more complex?” — Andrew Wiest and Susannah Ural, The New York Times, 9 Oct. 2017

Did you know?

When France’s King Louis XIV appointed Lieutenant Colonel Jean Martinet to be inspector general of the infantry in the late 17th century, he made a wise choice. As a drillmaster, Martinet trained his troops to advance into battle in precise linear formations and to fire in volleys only upon command, thus making the most effective use of inaccurate muskets—and making the French army one of the best on the continent. He also gave English a new word. Martinet has been used synonymously with “strict disciplinarian” since the early 18th century.


Lake桑

August 30, 2019 at 01:00PM

又一个周五!


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Lake桑

August 30, 2019 at 12:00PM

每日一词:augur(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 29, 2019 is:

augur • \AW-gur\  • verb

1 : to foretell especially from omens

2 : to give promise of : presage

Examples:

“The new discovery should provide insight into the elusive origins of the strange bright signals, and augurs a dawning era in which they will be found and studied by the thousands.” — Nola Taylor Redd, Scientific American, 13 Aug. 2018

“Still, combined with Denver’s lack of postseason experience, its recent struggles against top competition doesn’t augur well for a deep playoff run.” — Grant Hughes, Bleacher Report, 5 Apr. 2019

Did you know?

Auguring is what augurs did in ancient Rome. Augurs were official diviners whose function it was not to foretell the future, but to divine whether the gods approved of a proposed undertaking, such as a military move. They did so by various means, among them observing the behavior of birds and examining the entrails of sacrificed animals. Nowadays, the foretell sense of the verb is often used with an adverb, such as well. Augur comes from Latin and is related to the Latin verb augēre, meaning “to increase.”


Lake桑

August 29, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:irascible(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 28, 2019 is:

irascible • \ir-RASS-uh-bul\  • adjective

: marked by hot temper and easily provoked anger

Examples:

That tidy little house belongs to an irascible crank who never has a kind word for any of his neighbors.

“Working with Adam Baldwin, best known as the irascible mercenary Jayne in Firefly and Serenity and the gruff but lovable John Casey on Chuck, was another bonus.” — Tim Clodfelter, The News & Record (Greensboro, North Carolina), 9 June 2019

Did you know?

If you try to take apart irascible in the same manner as irrational, irresistible, or irresponsible, you might find yourself wondering what ascible means—but that’s not how irascible came to be. The key to the meaning of irascible isn’t the negative prefix ir- (which is a variant of the prefix in- that is used before words beginning with “r”), but the Latin noun ira, meaning “anger.” From ira, which is also the root of irate and ire, came the Latin verb irasci (“to become angry”) and the related adjective irascibilis, the latter of which led to the French irascible. English speakers borrowed the word from French in the 16th century.


Lake桑

August 28, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:desuetude(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 27, 2019 is:

desuetude • \DESS-wih-tood\  • noun

: discontinuance from use or exercise : disuse

Examples:

The old bridge, which fell into desuetude after the railroad was shut down, has recently been opened as a pedestrian walkway.

“It has been 15 years since Mr. Klein and his partners paid $18 million for the Sunset Tower, a faded Art Deco relic on a stretch of Sunset Strip that, although now booming, had fallen into funky desuetude. Against most odds and all prevailing wisdom, he soon established it and its Tower Bar restaurant as essential landmarks of the new Hollywood.” — Guy Trebay, The New York Times, 23 Feb. 2019

Did you know?

Desuetude must be closely related to disuse, right? Wrong. Despite the similarities between them, desuetude and disuse derive from two different Latin verbs. Desuetude comes from suescere, a word that means “to become accustomed” (suescere also gave us the word custom). Disuse descends from uti, which means “to use.” (That Latin word also gave us use and utility.) Although less common, desuetude hasn’t fallen into desuetude yet, and it was put to good use in the past, as in the 17th-century writings of Scottish Quaker Robert Barclay, who wrote, “The weighty Truths of God were neglected, and, as it were, went into Desuetude.”


Lake桑

August 27, 2019 at 01:00PM