生日快乐。

祝自己生日快乐。今年也不想说什么。
看到这里你可以留一个评论。(发自 IFTTT)

Lake桑

February 28, 2019 at 06:00PM

每日一词:billion(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for February 28, 2019 is:

billion • \BILL-yun\  • noun

1 US : a number equal to 1,000 million; also, British : a number equal to 1,000 milliard

2 : a very large number

Examples:

If you were to count to a billion at the rate of one number per second, it would take you over 31 and a half years to finish.

White dwarf stars start off extremely hot, but they no longer generate their own energy. And while they initially radiate enough heat that we can see them in our telescopes, they slowly lose their energy over billions of years.” — Deborah Netburn, The Bismark (North Dakota) Tribune, 15 Jan. 2019

Did you know?

How much is a billion? It might depend on whom you ask. Billion was borrowed from French in the late 1600s to indicate the number one million raised to the power of two, or a million million—a number represented by a 1 followed by 12 zeros. However, the French later changed their naming conventions so that a billion became a thousand million (a 1 followed by 9 zeros) and a trillion became a thousand thousand million (or a million million, the old billion). The French have since returned to the older system, but it was this new system that was adopted by American English speakers in the 1800s. In Britain, the newer system has seen increasing use since the 1950s, but the older sense is still sometimes used there as well.


Lake桑

February 28, 2019 at 01:00PM

温度。

iPad 在被窝里用热水袋加热以开机,然后过了头。

图示并非我的设备。

Lake桑

2019.2.27

每日一词:grift(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for February 27, 2019 is:

grift • \GRIFT\  • verb

1 : to obtain (money) illicitly (as in a confidence game)

2 : to acquire money or property illicitly

Examples:

The guidebook warns that the city’s con artists grift millions of dollars from unwary tourists annually.

“He’s somebody that lived and grifted, lived for the day. As soon as he got any money from some shady deal or whatever he was involved in, he just spent it.” — Richard E. Grant, quoted on Vox.com, 18 Oct. 2018

Did you know?

Grift was born in the argot of the underworld, a realm in which a “grifter” might be a pickpocket, a crooked gambler, or a confidence man—any criminal who relied on skill and wits rather than physical violence—and to be “on the grift” was to make a living by stings and clever thefts. Grift may have evolved from graft, a slightly older word meaning “to acquire dishonestly,” but its exact origins are uncertain. We do know that the verb grift first finagled its way into print in the early 20th century, as demonstrated in George Bronson-Howard’s 1915 novel God’s Man, where it appears in gerund form: “Grifting ain’t what it used to be. Fourteenth Street’s got protection down to a system—a regular underworld tariff on larceny.”


Lake桑

February 27, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:avuncular(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for February 26, 2019 is:

avuncular • \uh-VUNK-yuh-ler\  • adjective

1 : suggestive of an uncle especially in kindliness or geniality

2 : of or relating to an uncle

Examples:

At 18 years her senior, May’s brother was a steadying force in her life, supportive and avuncular.

“Today’s generation of fans knew [Stan] Lee as the avuncular elder statesman who regaled packed halls at comic conventions with stories of his years in the medium, and for his cameos in every Marvel movie, which he continued well into his 90s.” — Rob Salkowitz, Forbes, 12 Nov. 2018

Did you know?

Not all uncles are likeable fellows (Hamlet’s murderous Uncle Claudius, for example, isn’t exactly Mr. Nice Guy in William Shakespeare’s tragedy), but avuncular reveals that, as a group, uncles are generally seen as affable and benevolent, if at times a bit patronizing. Avuncular derives from the Latin noun avunculus, which translates as “maternal uncle,” but since at least the 19th century English speakers have used avuncular to refer to uncles from either side of the family or even to individuals who are simply uncle-like in character or behavior. And in case you were wondering, avunculus is also an ancestor of the word uncle itself.


Lake桑

February 26, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:impetus(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for February 25, 2019 is:

impetus • \IM-puh-tus\  • noun

1 a : a driving force : impulse

b : incentive, stimulus

c : stimulation or encouragement resulting in increased activity

2 : the property possessed by a moving body in virtue of its mass and its motion — used of bodies moving suddenly or violently to indicate the origin and intensity of the motion

Examples:

The high salary and generous benefits package were impetus enough to apply for the job.

“Several legislators who spoke at last week’s workshop cited a recent series by the Post & Courier of Charleston as the impetus for this year’s focus on education.” — Kirk Brown, The Greenville (South Carolina) News, 9 Jan. 2019

Did you know?

You already have plenty of incentive to learn the origin of impetus, so we won’t force the point. Impetus comes from Latin, where it means “attack or assault”; the verb impetere was formed by combining the prefix in- with petere, meaning “to go to or seek.” Petere also gives us other words suggesting a forceful urging or momentum, such as appetite, perpetual, and centripetal. Impetus describes the kind of force that encourages an action (“the impetus behind the project”) or the momentum of an action already begun (“the meetings only gave impetus to the rumors of a merger”).


Lake桑

February 25, 2019 at 01:00PM

又一个周一。

一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

February 25, 2019 at 07:00AM

每日一词:sequester(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for February 24, 2019 is:

sequester • \sih-KWESS-ter\  • verb

1 : to set apart : segregate

2 : to seize by authority of a writ

Examples:

The reality series will feature ten celebrity contestants who will be sequestered in a haunted mansion for twelve weeks.

“Typically, a judge makes the decision to sequester a jury, often when there is risk that outside interference could affect a juror’s ability to be fair and impartial or when there are heightened security concerns.” — Lydia Wheeler and Morgan Chalfant, The Hill, 20 Aug. 2018

Did you know?

Sequester first appeared in English in the 14th century. The word derives from Latin sequestrare (“to hand over to a trustee”) and ultimately from secus (“beside,” “otherwise”), which is akin to Latin sequi (“to follow”). In this relationship, we can trace links to words such as sequel, sequence, consequence, and subsequent, all of which convey a meaning of one thing following another. These days, we most frequently hear sequester used in legal contexts, as juries are sometimes sequestered for the safety of their members or to prevent the influence of outside sources on a verdict. In a different sense, it is possible to sequester property in certain legal situations.


Lake桑

February 24, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:chockablock(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for February 23, 2019 is:

chockablock • \CHAH-kuh-blahk\  • adjective

1 : brought close together

2 : very full

Examples:

“The one-square-mile borough is chockablock with shops, restaurants, small businesses, and a bustling downtown.” — Katie Park, The Philadelphia Inquirer, 13 Jan. 2019

“The release schedule for the next few months of music is chockablock with new voices, classic names, and bands in the process of transitioning from the first category to the second.” — Spencer Kornhaber, The Atlantic, 5 Sept. 2017

Did you know?

Chockablock started out as a nautical term. A block is a metal or wooden case with one or more pulleys inside. Sometimes, two or more blocks are used as part of a rope and pulley system called a “block and tackle” to provide a mechanical advantage—as, for example, when hoisting a sail on a traditional sailing ship. When the rope is pulled as far as it will go, the blocks are tight together and are said to be chockablock. Non-nautical types associated the chock in chockablock with chock-full, which goes back to Middle English chokkefull, meaning “full to the limit” (a figurative use of “full to choking”). We thus gave chockablock the additional meaning “filled up.” Chockablock can also be an adverb meaning “as close or as completely as possible,” as in “families living chockablock” or the seemingly redundant “chockablock full.”


Lake桑

February 23, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:minion(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for February 22, 2019 is:

minion • \MIN-yun\  • noun

1 : a servile dependent, follower, or underling

2 : one highly favored : idol

3 : a subordinate or petty official

Examples:

The senior executive has a small platoon of minions to run both personal and business errands for him.

“Smartphones make it easier for managers to change their minds at the last moment: for example, to e-mail a minion at 11pm to tell him he must fly to Pittsburgh tomorrow.” — The Economist, 10 Mar. 2012

Did you know?

Minion comes to us from Middle French and has a somewhat surprising cousin in English: filet mignon. The two words are connected by way of Middle French mignon, meaning “darling.” Minion entered English around 1500 directly from Middle French, whereas filet mignon arrived significantly later by way of a modern French phrase meaning “dainty fillet.” The earliest uses of minion referred to someone who was a particular favorite, or darling, of a sovereign or other important personage. Over time, however, the word developed a more derogatory sense referring to a person who is servile and unimportant.


Lake桑

February 22, 2019 at 01:00PM

又一个周五!


周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

February 22, 2019 at 12:00PM

每日一词:hoopla(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for February 21, 2019 is:

hoopla • \HOO-plah\  • noun

1 : excited commotion : to-do

2 : exaggerated or sensational promotion or publicity : ballyhoo

Examples:

“Ideas change as data accumulate. If future evidence causes me to change my mind again, that’s okay. That’s how the scientific method works, always revising what we thought we knew, eventually casting aside the emotional hoopla, and ultimately granting us not a measure of truth so much as a better approximation of reality.” — Eric J. Chaisson, The Atlantic, 16 Oct. 2018

“My wife and I were watching all this [government] shutdown hoopla on television. My wife then said, ‘Why don’t you serve them meals?’ So we decided to extend it out to all of the Coast Guard members stationed here….” — James Gubata, quoted in The Providence Journal, 15 Jan. 2019

Did you know?

In French, the interjection houp-là is used roughly the same way as English’s upsy-daisy or whoops-a-daisy, as one might say when picking up a child. (This usage can be found in English, too, in such works as Booth Tarkington’s The Magnificent Ambersons and James Joyce’s Ulysses.) When the word was borrowed into American English, however, it was to refer to a kind of bustling commotion, and later, as a term for sensationalist hype. In the early 20th century, another hoopla was in use as well. Playing on the syllable hoop, that word gave its name to a ring-toss game played at carnivals.


Lake桑

February 21, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:obsequious(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for February 20, 2019 is:

obsequious • \ub-SEE-kwee-us\  • adjective

: marked by or exhibiting a fawning attentiveness

Examples:

“Not pleasing others enough amounts to surliness, pleasing too much makes one obsequious—you have to be friendly, but not too friendly. The sweet spot in the middle is where you want to be.” — Carlin Flora, Psychology Today, 1 July 2017

“She read up on professors beforehand and, if their written work was accessible, familiarized herself with it, so she could make mention of it. That flattered them and pegged her as a serious, considerate person. Taking that too far, of course, could be repulsively obsequious.” — Frank Bruni, The New York Times, 19 Aug. 2018

Did you know?

An obsequious person is more likely to be a follower than a leader. Use that fact to help you remember the meaning of obsequious. All you need to do is bear in mind that the word comes from the Latin root sequi, meaning “to follow.” (The other contributor is the prefix ob-, meaning “toward.”) Sequi is the source of a number of other English words, too, including consequence (a result that follows from an action), sequel (a novel, film, or TV show that follows and continues a story begun in another), and non sequitur (a conclusion that doesn’t follow from what was said before).


Lake桑

February 20, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:emote(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for February 19, 2019 is:

emote • \ih-MOHT\  • verb

: to give expression to emotion especially in acting

Examples:

“It’s not always immediately obvious, but sometimes you fall in love with a band for the way the singers emote.” — James Reed, The Boston Globe, 24 Jan. 2012

“Aiming for a higher quality than masks allowed, the makeup artist John Chambers developed a new type of foam rubber and created facial appliances that allowed actors to talk and emote.” — Andrew R. Chow, The New York Times, 31 Dec. 2018

Did you know?

Emote is an example of what linguists call a back-formation—that is, a word formed by trimming down an existing word (in this case, emotion). As is sometimes the case with back-formations, emote has since its coinage in the early 20th century tended toward use that is less than entirely serious. It frequently appears in humorous or deprecating descriptions of the work of actors, and is similarly used to describe theatrical behavior by nonactors. Though a writer sometimes wants us to take someone’s “emoting” seriously, a phrase like “expressing emotion” avoids the chance that we will hear some snideness in the writer’s words.


Lake桑

February 19, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:prestigious(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for February 18, 2019 is:

prestigious • \preh-STIH-juss\  • adjective

1 archaic : of, relating to, or marked by illusion, conjuring, or trickery

2 : having an illustrious name or reputation : esteemed in general opinion

Examples:

Carla was overjoyed to receive an acceptance letter from the prestigious university.

“The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art has announced 16 finalists for its closely watched SECA [Society for the Encouragement of Contemporary Art] Art Award for 2019. The awards are the region’s most prestigious recognition for emerging artists.” — Charles Desmarais, The San Francisco Chronicle, 14 Dec. 2018

Did you know?

You may be surprised to learn that prestigious had more to do with trickery than with respect when it was first used in the mid-16th century. The earliest (now archaic) meaning of the word was “of, relating to, or marked by illusion, conjuring, or trickery.” Prestigious comes to us from the Latin word praestigiosis, meaning “full of tricks” or “deceitful.” The words prestige and prestigious are related, of course, though not as directly as you might think; they share a Latin ancestor, but they entered English by different routes. Prestige, which was borrowed from French in the mid-17th century, initially meant “a conjurer’s trick,” but in the 19th century it developed an extended sense of “blinding or dazzling influence.” That change, in turn, influenced prestigious, which now means simply “illustrious or esteemed.”


Lake桑

February 18, 2019 at 01:00PM

又一个周一。

一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

February 18, 2019 at 07:00AM

感觉怎么什么都走了。

RT

Lake桑

2019.2.17

每日一词:disavow(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for February 17, 2019 is:

disavow • \dis-uh-VOW\  • verb

1 : to deny responsibility for : repudiate

2 : to refuse to acknowledge or accept : disclaim

Examples:

It seems the college’s president is now trying to disavow her previous statements.

“Last week in Beijing, [‘Crazy Rich Asians’] director Jon M. Chu essentially disavowed every word in the film’s title. ‘The film is a satire,’ Chu told the state-affiliated Global Times. ‘It’s not about “crazy rich” or “Asians” actually—it’s about the opposite of that. It’s about how all those things mean nothing and it comes down to our own relationships and finding love and our own families.'” — Rebecca Davis, Variety, 29 Nov. 2018

Did you know?

If you trace the etymology of disavow back through Middle English to Anglo-French, you’ll arrive eventually at the prefix des- and the verb avouer, meaning “to avow.” The prefix des-, in turn, derives from the Latin prefix dis-, meaning “apart.” That Latin prefix plays a significant role in many current English words, including disadvantage, disappoint, and disagree. Avouer is from Latin advocare, meaning “to summon,” and is also the source of our word advocate.


Lake桑

February 17, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:gibbous(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for February 16, 2019 is:

gibbous • \JIB-us\  • adjective

1 a : marked by convexity or swelling

b of the moon or a planet : seen with more than half but not all of the apparent disk illuminated

2 : having a hump : humpbacked

Examples:

The fresh layer of snow glistened under the light of the waxing gibbous moon.

“During the fourth lunar orbit, Anders was engaged in photographing the lunar surface when he noticed a slightly gibbous Earth rising above the surface as the spacecraft passed over from the moon’s far side to its near side.” — Alan Hale, The Alamogordo (New Mexico) Daily News, 23 Dec. 2018

Did you know?

The adjective gibbous has its origins in the Latin noun gibbus, meaning “hump,” and in the Late Latin adjective gibbosus, meaning “humpbacked,” which Middle English adopted in the 14th century as gibbous. Gibbous has been used to describe the rounded body parts of humans and animals (such as the back of a camel) or to describe the shape of certain flowers (such as snapdragons). The term is most often identified, however, with the study of astronomy. A gibbous moon is one that is more than a half-moon but less than full.


Lake桑

February 16, 2019 at 01:00PM

我的微博:No title(来自 Lake桑的微博)

原文链接

Lake桑

我的微博:No title(来自 Lake桑的微博)

原文链接

Lake桑

每日一词:apotheosis(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for February 15, 2019 is:

apotheosis • \uh-pah-thee-OH-sis\  • noun

1 a : the perfect form or example of something : quintessence

b : the highest or best part of something : peak

2 : elevation to divine status : deification

Examples:

“Four decades after its box office debut, Grease remains a cultural phenomenon.… [Olivia] Newton-John is particularly stellar, with her charming persona and spotless soprano voice making the film the apotheosis of her ’70s superstardom.” — Billboard.com, 4 Oct. 2018

“In 2018, this adaptation [of Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451] speaks to the apotheosis of social media, to the approach of authoritarianism, and to any other anxieties about the self-surveillance state that you might harbor.” — Troy Patterson, The New Yorker, 18 May 2018

Did you know?

Among the ancient Greeks, it was sometimes thought fitting—or simply handy, say if you wanted a god somewhere in your bloodline—to grant someone or other “god” status. So they created the word apotheōsis, from the verb apotheoun, meaning “to deify.” (The prefix apo- can mean “off,” “from,” or “away,” and theos is the Greek word for “god.”) There’s not a lot of Greek-style apotheosizing in the 21st century, but there is hero-worship. Our extended use of apotheosis as “elevation to divine status” is the equivalent of “placement on a very high pedestal.” Even more common these days is to use apotheosis in reference to a perfect example or ultimate form. For example, one might describe a movie as “the apotheosis of the sci-fi movie genre.”


Lake桑

February 15, 2019 at 01:00PM

又一个周五!


周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

February 15, 2019 at 12:00PM

每日一词:heartstring(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for February 14, 2019 is:

heartstring • \HAHRT-string\  • noun

: the deepest emotions or affections — usually used in plural

Examples:

“While on Facebook, have you ever come across a posting that tugs at your heartstrings? Photos of adorable abandoned puppies, say, or a story about a cute little girl who didn’t get any happy birthday wishes? You instinctively click the ‘thumbs-up’ or add a comment (Happy birthday!) and maybe even decide to share the posting.” — Mary C. Hickey, Consumer Reports, June 2018

“There are two moments in ‘Mary Poppins Returns’ when the grown-ups watching really lose it: Dick Van Dyke’s arrival and when Angela Lansbury starts singing. Those are playing on a lifetime of heartstrings.” — Lin-Manuel Miranda, quoted in USA Today, 27 Dec. 2018

Did you know?

Before a song or movie or heart-shaped card accompanied by a box of chocolates could tug at your heartstrings, the job was more likely to be accomplished by a surgeon: the word heartstring used to refer to a nerve believed to sustain the heart. You might recognize the word’s second syllable in the term hamstring, which refers to both a group of tendons at the back of the knee and to any of three muscles at the backs of the upper legs. It’s also apparent in a rare dialect term for the Achilles’ tendon: heel string. And in light of these terms, it’s not surprising to know that string itself was at one time used independently to refer to cords like tendons and ligaments.


Lake桑

February 14, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:cacophony(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for February 13, 2019 is:

cacophony • \ka-KAH-fuh-nee\  • noun

1 : harsh or discordant sound : dissonance; specifically : harshness in the sound of words or phrases

2 : an incongruous or chaotic mixture : a striking combination

Examples:

“But never in their most uneasy dreams did they expect the cacophony—a word which here means ‘the sound of two metal pots being banged together by a nasty foreman standing in the doorway holding no breakfast at all’—that awoke them.” — Lemony Snicket, The Miserable Mill, 2000

“Divided into groups of ten or so, the students came forward for an opportunity to play the instruments. The cacophony that resulted was matched only by the children’s broad smiles as they blew tubas, banged on drums or drew bows across violins.” — Steven Felschundneff, The Claremont (California) Courier, 29 Nov. 2018

Did you know?

Words that descend from the Greek word phōnē are making noise in English. Why? Because phōnē means “sound” or “voice.” Cacophony comes from a joining of the Greek prefix kak- (from kakos,meaning “bad”) with phōnē, so it essentially means “bad sound.” Symphony, a word that indicates harmony or agreement in sound, traces to phōnē and the Greek prefix syn-, which means “together.” Polyphony refers to a style of musical composition in which two or more independent melodies are juxtaposed in harmony, and it comes from a combination of phōnē and the Greek prefix poly-, meaning “many.” And euphony, a word for a pleasing or sweet sound, combines phōnē with eu-, a prefix that means “good.”


Lake桑

February 13, 2019 at 01:00PM

每日一词:teem(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for February 12, 2019 is:

teem • \TEEM\  • verb

1 : to become filled to overflowing : abound

2 : to be present in large quantity

Examples:

“On Friday, Tselikis stood in front of the Red’s Best stall at Boston’s Public Market, offering up tidbits about lobsters as they teemed inside a tank.” — Gintautas Dumcius, MassLive.com, 10 June 2016

“But beneath the surface, some of the rigs are teeming with biological life. Dozens of fish species, thousands of different kinds of invertebrates, and sea lions all call the rigs home.” — Erik Olsen, Quartz, 17 Nov. 2018

Did you know?

The verb teem and the noun team are not just homophones, they are also etymological kin. Teem is derived from Old English tīman or tæman, which originally meant “to bring forth offspring” or “to become pregnant.” That word is related to the ancestor of team, the Old English noun tēam, meaning “offspring, lineage, or group of draft animals.” Team can still be used to refer to a brood of young animals, especially pigs or ducks, but both teem and team have otherwise largely left their offspring-related senses behind.


Lake桑

February 12, 2019 at 01:00PM

我的微博:喏//@Golden橙汁:油和辣其实不会引发痘痘的(来自 Lake桑的微博)

原文链接
喏//@Golden橙汁:油和辣其实不会引发痘痘的,它只是加速发痘痘。糖和奶制品才会引起痘痘

转发 @麗芙Lif: 难道算吗

Lake桑

每日一词:bardolater(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for February 11, 2019 is:

bardolater • \bar-DAH-luh-ter\  • noun

: a person who idolizes Shakespeare

Examples:

The song retells the story of “Othello,” but in such subtle language that only bardolaters are likely to recognize it.

“[W]hether you’re a bona fide Bardolater or someone who uses Shakespeare as an excuse to eat brie on a blanket under the summer stars, here’s a brief round-up of where to satisfy your appetite for Shakespeare this summer.” — Jenny Terpsichore Abeles, The Recorder (Greenfield, Massachusetts), 15 June 2017

Did you know?

George Bernard Shaw once described a William Shakespeare play as “stagy trash.” Another time, Shaw said he’d like to dig Shakespeare from the grave and throw stones at him. Shaw could be equally scathing toward Shakespeare’s adoring fans. He called them “foolish Bardolaters,” wrote of “Bardolatrous” ignoramuses, and called blind Shakespeare worship “Bardolatry.” Oddly enough, Shaw didn’t despise Shakespeare or his work (on the contrary, he was, by his own admission, an admirer), but he disdained those who placed the man beyond reproach. The word bardolater, which Shaw coined by blending Shakespeare’s epithet—”the Bard“—with an affix that calls to mind idolater, has stuck with us to this day, though it has lost some of its original critical sting.


Lake桑

February 11, 2019 at 01:00PM

又一个周一。

一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

February 11, 2019 at 07:01AM

关于注音符号。

ㄓㄨㄥˋㄉㄨˊㄅㄧˋㄧㄥˉㄐㄧㄝˊ

ㄔㄥˊㄧㄡˇㄌㄧㄡˊㄙㄨㄢˉㄊㄨㄥˊㄖㄨㄥˊㄧㄝˋㄉㄜ˙ㄕㄠˉㄅㄟˉ

等一下,上面标的不是拼音?

来,用“朗读所选项”读一下下面的文字。

ㄓㄨㄥˋㄉㄨˊㄅㄧˋㄧㄥˉㄐㄧㄝˊ

ㄔㄥˊㄧㄡˇㄌㄧㄡˊㄙㄨㄢˉㄊㄨㄥˊㄖㄨㄥˊㄧㄝˋㄉㄜ˙ㄕㄠˉㄅㄟˉ

真的是“重读闭音节”和“盛有硫酸铜溶液的烧杯”。

那么我便考你一考。

ㄒㄩㄝˊㄧㄝˋㄧㄡˇㄔㄥˊ

点击查看答案。

学业有成

这就是注音符号(ㄓㄨˋㄧㄣㄈㄨˊㄏㄠˋ,zhù yīn fú hào)(Bopomofo,ㄅㄆㄇㄈ),现在台湾仍然在使用的一套汉字表音方案。

注音符号大多取自古字中的一部分,切其中的一个韵,作为这个注音符号的音。比如”ㄅ”(b),取自“勹”,“包”的古字,单独的注音符号本该读作“ㄅㄠ”(bāo),但一般读作“ㄅㄛ”(bō)。

在网上查一下拼音与注音对照表,你就可以知道对应关系了。

而对于声调来说,所有的四个声调写在一字的注音的最后一个符号的上方(多用,一般用于书写)或右上角(计算机),“ˉ”(一短横)表阴平,即第一声,一般省略。“ˊ”(一短提)表阳平,即第二声。“ˇ”(一短顿再一短提)是上声(读ㄕㄤˇㄕㄥˉ,shǎng shēng),第三声,“ˋ”(一短顿)是去声,第四声,以及“˙”(一点,写在一个字注音的最前面),轻声,特殊的音调丢失的符号,不在四声调之列,以及“·”(一点,写在注音的右下角)表示北方方言现在并不存在的入声。再次提醒,阴平省略不写,即不写音调就读第一声。

那么,ㄐㄧㄡˋㄗㄞˋㄓㄜˋㄌㄧˇㄍㄟˇㄉㄚˋㄐㄧㄚˉㄅㄞˋㄍㄜ˙ㄨㄢˇㄋㄧㄢˊㄅㄚ˙。ㄒㄧㄣˉㄋㄧㄢˊㄎㄨㄞˋㄌㄜˋ。

ㄌㄟˊㄎㄜˋㄙㄤˉ

ㄦˋㄌㄧㄥˊㄧˉㄐㄧㄡˇㄋㄧㄢˊㄦˋㄩㄝˋㄕˊㄖˋ