每日一词:dram(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 30, 2018 is:

dram • \DRAM\  • noun

1 a : a unit of avoirdupois weight equal to 1/16 ounce

b : a unit of apothecaries’ weight equal to 1/8 ounce

c : a unit of liquid capacity equal to 1/8 fluid ounce

2 a : a small portion of something to drink

b : a small amount

Examples:

The two of them don’t have a dram of sense between them, so I’m not surprised that they got into so much trouble.

“Do you know what I just found out? Monkey Shoulder blended Scotch? Totally not made from monkey shoulders. As far as I’m informed, there are no monkey parts whatsoever in this delicious dram.” — Mat Dinsmore, The Coloradoan, 22 Jan. 2014

Did you know?

In avoirdupois weight—that is, the system of weights commonly used in North America and the United Kingdom—a dram is equal to 1/16 ounce (1.772 grams). The word dram was borrowed from the Anglo-French and Late Latin word dragme, which was originally used for a silver coin used by the ancient Greeks (now known in English as the drachma) as well as for the coin’s approximate weight. In the 16th century, English speakers began also using dram for a weight of fluid measure (also called a fluid dram) equal to 1/8 fluid ounce, and more loosely for any small portion of something to drink. Dram is also used figuratively for any small amount, in much the same way as grain and ounce.


Lake桑

November 30, 2018 at 01:00PM

又一个周五!


周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

November 30, 2018 at 12:00PM

每日一词:ritzy(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 29, 2018 is:

ritzy • \RIT-see\  • adjective

1 : being, characteristic of, or befitting a snob : snobbish

2 : impressively or ostentatiously fancy or stylish : fashionable, posh

Examples:

“Pop star Justin Timberlake … hosted a listening party for his new album at a ritzy Manhattan loft where catering was provided by René Redzepi’s impossible-to-get-into Copenhagen restaurant….” — Greg Morabito, Eater.com, 17 Jan. 2018

“Allen owned one of the most desirable properties in California, a 120-acre parcel on a hilltop in ritzy Beverly Crest that is on the market for $150 million.” — Scott Kraft, The Los Angeles Times, 15 Oct. 2018

Did you know?

César Ritz (1850-1918) earned worldwide renown for the luxurious hotels bearing his name in London and Paris. (The Ritz-Carlton hotel company is a contemporary descendant of these enterprises.) Although they were by no means the first to cater to high-end clients, Ritz’s hotels quickly earned reputations as symbols of opulence. F. Scott Fitzgerald, a writer who often focused on the fashionably wealthy, titled one of his short stories “The Diamond as Big as the Ritz,” and the phrase “to put on the ritz” means “to indulge in ostentatious display.” The adjective ritzy, describing either something fancy or stylish, or the haughty attitudes of the wealthy elite, first checked into the English language in 1920.


Lake桑

November 29, 2018 at 01:00PM

每日一词:betwixt(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 28, 2018 is:

betwixt • \bih-TWIKST\  • adverb or preposition

: between

Examples:

“O villainous! I have looked upon the world for four times / seven years, and since I could distinguish betwixt a benefit and / an injury, I never found man that knew how to love himself.” — William Shakespeare, Othello, 1622

Barry is a bit betwixt and between as a viewing experience: too violent for people who don’t like violence, not energetic or dramatic enough for people who do.” — Willa Paskin, Slate Magazine, 23 Mar. 2018

Did you know?

“Jack Sprat could eat no fat, his wife could eat no lean; and so betwixt the two of them, they licked the platter clean.” Perhaps you’ve always said “and so between the two of them” when reciting the tale of Jack Sprat and his wife. That’s fine. Betwixt and between have similar origins: they both come from a combination of be- and related Old English roots. Both words appeared before the 12th century, but use of betwixt dropped off considerably toward the end of the 1600s. It survived in the phrase “betwixt and between” (“neither one thing nor the other”), which took on a life of its own in the 18th century. Nowadays, betwixt is uncommon, but it isn’t archaic; it’s simply used more consciously than between.


Lake桑

November 28, 2018 at 01:00PM

每日一词:yahoo(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 27, 2018 is:

yahoo • \YAH-hoo\  • noun

1 capitalized Yahoo : a member of a race of brutes in Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels who have the form and all the vices of humans

2 : a boorish, crass, or stupid person

Examples:

The reputation the teenagers had for being a bunch of self-involved yahoos was belied by their courteous treatment of the stranded motorists.

“In a place like America, we seem to revel in these geographic judgments. And so Northerners stereotype Southerners as Confederate flag-waving, pickup driving, moonshine-drinking yahoos and Southerners depict Northerners as snooty, elitist, big city, latte-drinking, Volvo-driving liberals.” — John F. Hudson, The Cambridge (Massachusetts) Chronicle, 31 May 2018

Did you know?

We know exactly how old yahoo is because its debut in print also marked its entrance into the English language as a whole. Yahoo began life as a made-up word invented by Jonathan Swift in his book Gulliver’s Travels, which was published in 1726. On his fourth and final voyage of the book, Lemuel Gulliver is marooned on an island that is the home of the Houyhnhnms, a species of intelligent, civilized horses who share their land with and rule over the Yahoos, a species of brutes with the form and vices of humans. These Yahoos represented Swift’s view of humankind at its lowest. It is not surprising, then, that yahoo came to be applied to any actual human who was particularly unpleasant or unintelligent.


Lake桑

November 27, 2018 at 01:00PM

每日一词:quirk(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 26, 2018 is:

quirk • \KWERK\  • verb

: curve, twist

Examples:

“If you quirked your eyebrow at The Shape of Water‘s merman, your jaw probably dropped clean off when you realized that some viewers were, well, thirsty for the marine man.” — Melissa Broder and Samantha Hunt, Elle, 14 Sept. 2018

“The video was of a laughing baby, and I felt the corners of my mouth quirking up. After, the computer asked me how I’d felt while watching. ‘Happy,’ I clicked.” — Elizabeth Svoboda, MIT Technology Review, 16 Aug. 2018

Did you know?

Did you expect quirk to be a noun meaning “a peculiarity of action or behavior”? If so, you’re probably not alone; the “peculiarity” sense of the noun quirk is commonly known and has been a part of our language since the 17th century. But quirk has long worn other hats in English, too. The sense meaning “a curve, turn, or twist” has named everything from curving pen marks on paper (i.e., flourishes) to witty turns of phrase to the vagaries or twists of fate. In contemporary English, the verb quirk can be used in referring to facial expressions, especially those that involve crooked smiles or furrowed eyebrows.


Lake桑

November 26, 2018 at 01:00PM

又一个周一。

一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

November 26, 2018 at 07:00AM

每日一词:occlusion(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 25, 2018 is:

occlusion • \uh-KLOO-zhun\  • noun

1 : the act of occluding : the state of being occluded: such as

a : the complete obstruction of the breath passage in the articulation of a speech sound

b : the bringing of the opposing surfaces of the teeth of the two jaws into contact; also : the relation between the surfaces when in contact

c : the inclusion or sorption of gas trapped during solidification of a material

2 : the front formed by a cold front overtaking a warm front and lifting the warm air above the earth’s surface

Examples:

The meteorologist said that the weakening occlusion heading up the coast would lead to off-and-on rain showers throughout the night.

“The company’s facial recognition technology can identify a particular person even in complex situations and accounts for variables like facial changes, age-gender handling, as well as facial occlusion.” — Abhishek Baxi, Forbes, 28 Sept. 2018

Did you know?

Occlusion is a descendant of the Latin verb occludere, meaning “to close up.” Occludere in turn comes from the prefix ob-, here meaning “in the way,” and the verb claudere, meaning “to close or shut.” Occlusion is one of many English terms derived from claudere. Some others are recluse, seclusion, and exclude. An occlusion occurs when something has been closed up or blocked off. Almost all heart attacks are the result of the occlusion of a coronary (heart) artery by a blood clot. When a person’s upper and lower teeth form a malocclusion, they close incorrectly or badly. An occlusion, or occluded front, happens when a fast-moving cold front overtakes a slow-moving warm front and slides underneath it, lifting the warm air and blocking its movement.


Lake桑

November 25, 2018 at 01:00PM

我的微博:Repost(来自 Lake桑的微博)

原文链接
Repost

转发 @一起神回复: 剩下的2018年内,你为之努力的所有事情都会成功。

Lake桑

我的微博:蔡徐坤(来自 Lake桑的微博)

原文链接
蔡徐坤

转发 @橙喵SM_chennn: 蔡徐坤

Lake桑

每日一词:audacious(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 24, 2018 is:

audacious • \aw-DAY-shus\  • adjective

1 a : intrepidly daring : adventurous

b : recklessly bold : rash

2 : contemptuous of law, religion, or decorum : insolent

3 : marked by originality and verve

Examples:

The band has been making original and creative music for well over ten years, but their latest album is by far their most audacious to date.

“[Patrick Mahomes] has already thrown 14 touchdown passes without an interception, and his ability to make plays when everything breaks down—like that audacious left-handed pass against the Broncos—has turned him into an early MVP front-runner.” — Dave Skretta, The Cincinnati (Ohio) Enquirer, 7 Oct. 2018

Did you know?

Audacious first appeared in English in the mid-1500s. It was borrowed from the Middle French adjective audacieux, which was derived from the noun audace (“boldness, audacity”). Audace came from the Latin audacia, a derivative of the Latin root audac- (“bold”). Audac- is also the source of audacity, which appeared in Middle English (as audacite) in the 1400s. Audac- can be traced, by way of the Latin verb audēre (“to dare”), to the Latin adjective avidus (“eager” or “greedy”), which was also borrowed by English, either directly from Latin or via the French avide, to give us our adjective avid. Among the early adopters of audacious was William Shakespeare, who used the word seven times in his plays, as in Henry VI, Part 2, where Somerset addresses York with the lines, “I arrest thee, York, / Of capital treason ‘gainst the King and crown. / Obey, audacious traitor, kneel for grace.”


Lake桑

November 24, 2018 at 01:00PM

每日一词:impromptu(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 23, 2018 is:

impromptu • \im-PROMP-too\  • adjective

1 : made, done, or formed on or as if on the spur of the moment : improvised

2 : composed or uttered without previous preparation : extemporaneous

Examples:

When we got word of Caitlin’s good news, we threw an impromptu party to celebrate.

“West capped off his curious musical guest gig, where he subbed for Ariana Grande, with a rambling rant after NBC’s broadcast ended. The impromptu speech was captured by Chris Rock, who posted it to his Instagram Story.” — Kim Willis, USA Today, 30 Sept. 2018

Did you know?

If you think that impromptu looks like a relative of the adjective prompt, you’re right; both are ultimately derived from the Latin promere, meaning “to bring forth, take out.” Impromptu was borrowed from French, where it meant “extemporaneously,” but French speakers picked it up from the Latin phrase in promptu, a promere descendant meaning “in readiness” or “at hand.” Something that is impromptu is generally “prompted” (that English verb is from Latin promptus, of the same meaning) by an occasion that generates a response in the form of, for example, a party or a speech that has not been planned. There is also another, much rarer descendant of promere in English: the noun promptuary, meaning “a book of ready reference.”


Lake桑

November 23, 2018 at 01:00PM

又一个周五!


周五中午啦~ 吃完午饭,下午继续工作! (由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

November 23, 2018 at 12:00PM

每日一词:cornucopia(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 22, 2018 is:

cornucopia • \kor-nuh-KOH-pee-uh\  • noun

1 : a curved, hollow goat’s horn or similarly shaped receptacle (such as a horn-shaped basket) that is overflowing especially with fruit and vegetables (such as gourds, ears of corn, apples, and grapes) and that is used as a decorative motif emblematic of abundance

2 : an inexhaustible store : abundance

3 : a receptacle shaped like a horn or cone

Examples:

“While the auction will offer a cornucopia of decorative and fine art spanning many centuries and continents, its crown jewels are the Impressionist, Post-Impressionist, and modern paintings.” — James Reginato, Vanity Fair, Holiday 2017

“With the veritable cornucopia of fitness gurus, fad diets, weight-loss programmes, and food boot-camps present today, it’s not shocking that there is an information overload on nutrition everywhere.” — Pooja Sachin Duggal, Business World, 14 Apr. 2018

Did you know?

Cornucopia comes from Latin cornu copiae, which translates literally as “horn of plenty.” A traditional staple of feasts, the cornucopia is believed to represent the horn of a goat from Greek mythology. According to legend, it was from this horn that the god Zeus was fed as an infant. Later, the horn was filled with flowers and fruits, and given as a present to Zeus. The filled horn (or a receptacle resembling it) has long served as a traditional symbol in art and decoration to suggest a store of abundance. The word first appeared in English in the early 16th century; a century later, it developed the figurative sense of an overflowing supply.


Lake桑

November 22, 2018 at 01:00PM

每日一词:noisome(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 21, 2018 is:

noisome • \NOY-sum\  • adjective

1 : noxious, harmful

2 a : offensive to the senses and especially to the sense of smell

b : highly obnoxious or objectionable

Examples:

“The streets were narrow and very dirty, the air smoky and noisome, the people mostly wretched.” — Ken Follett, The Man From St. Petersburg, 1982

“The last two newspaper offices where I worked were based in not-so-safe or particularly pretty areas of a city, and most nights when I left work I had to breathe in the noisome aromas of swamp gas, paper mill, deteriorating sewer lines and a dog food processing plant….” — Jackie Torok, The Brunswick Beacon (Shallotte, North Carolina), 27 May 2014

Did you know?

Noisome sounds like it might be a synonym of noisy, but it’s not. Something noisome is disgusting, offensive, or harmful, often in its smell. Noisome does not come from noise, but from the Middle English word noysome, which has the same meaning as noisome. Noysome was formed by combining the noun noy, which means “annoyance,” with the adjectival suffix -some (“characterized by a (specified) thing, quality, state, or action”). Noy comes from Anglo-French anui, which also means “annoyance.” As you may have already guessed, the English words annoy and annoyance are also related to noisome.


Lake桑

November 21, 2018 at 01:00PM

每日一词:perforce(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 20, 2018 is:

perforce • \per-FORSS\  • adverb

: by force of circumstances

Examples:

“All that frantic traveling was in lieu of any compelling reason to stay home, and those many, many friendships were perforce conducted at long distance.” — Blake Bailey, The New York Times Book Review, 28 Dec. 2012

“But by making an opera about television—a source of entertainment for the Everyman—they are, perforce, creating a marriage of high and low.” — Hilton Als, The New Yorker, 12 Mar. 2018

Did you know?

English speakers borrowed par force from Anglo-French in the 14th century. Par meant “by” (from Latin per) and the Anglo-French word force had the same meaning as its English equivalent, which was already in use by then. At first, perforce meant quite literally “by physical coercion.” That meaning is no longer used today, but it was still prevalent in William Shakespeare’s lifetime (1564-1616). “He rush’d into my house and took perforce my ring away,” wrote the Bard in The Comedy of Errors. The “by force of circumstances” sense of perforce had also come into use by Shakespeare’s day. In Henry IV, Part 2, we find “… your health; the which, if you give o’er to stormy passion, must perforce decay.”


Lake桑

November 20, 2018 at 01:00PM

我的微博:小绿和小蓝 追加了一点机器人篇《发布会》…(来自 Lake桑的微博)

原文链接
哇笛子改剧情了(

转发 @笛子Ocarina: #小绿和小蓝[超话]# 追加了一点机器人篇《发布会》下篇(http://t.cn/E29ZyGh)的剧情。不是幕后花絮,是改了一点原来的故事。

这段的剧情在画的时候我就很烦恼——按理说大公司是不允许人那么随意地打断发布会的,但如果小蓝被带走,没上台发言,这段故事就没意思了(要怎样啊,对着上司表白吗)。我在画的时候始终没想好该怎么解决,只好简单带过了。

但事后想想,我还真想出了怎么改比较好!我一般不改已经画完的故事,但这段剧情蛮重要的,不改感觉会一直有遗憾,所以还是改了。这样也顺便强调了一下小蓝非得跑上台去的动机,个人感觉还不错-v-

红色覆盖部分是原有剧情,白色部分是新加剧情,一共在三个地方加了三小段,别的没改。APP那边我会把格子的顺序整体顺好,微博已经发过的故事我就不动了,本条微博算是简单跟大家作个交代吧。

Lake桑

每日一词:henchman(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 19, 2018 is:

henchman • \HENCH-mun\  • noun

1 : a trusted follower : right-hand man

2 : a political follower whose support is chiefly for personal advantage

3 : a member of a gang

Examples:

“The story follows the lives to two very different characters—Frank Guidry, a henchman for one of New Orleans’ most powerful and vicious gangsters, and Charlotte, a woman struggling to raise her two daughters while dealing with a feckless, drunken husband.” — James D. Watts Jr., The Tulsa (Oklahoma) World, 11 Oct. 2018

“Since Mr. Mugabe’s ouster, Mr. Mnangagwa has tried to remake Zimbabwe’s image by portraying the government as business-friendly. He has appeared often at investors’ conferences, wearing warm, colorful scarves to offset his fearsome reputation as Mr. Mugabe’s former henchman.” — Norimitsu Onishi, The New York Times, 30 July 2018

Did you know?

The earliest known examples of today’s word in written English show it being used as a term for a squire or a page, but the word may have seen earlier use with the meaning “groom.” It first appeared in Middle English in the 14th century and is a combination of Old English hengest (“a male horse”) and man. In the mid-1700s, henchman began to be used for the personal attendant of a Scottish Highland chief. This sense, made familiar to many English readers by Sir Walter Scott, led to the word’s use in the broader sense of “right-hand man,” which in turn evolved into the other meanings.


Lake桑

November 19, 2018 at 01:00PM

又一个周一。

一周又开始了。加油工作!(由 IFTTT 发送)

Lake桑

November 19, 2018 at 07:00AM

我的微博:没有语言的话就没有记忆呢(似乎有这个说法)。所以他(来自 Lake桑的微博)

原文链接
没有语言的话就没有记忆呢(似乎有这个说法)。所以他记不住一切,甚至记不住情绪。所以每一个月都是崭新的。

转发 @麦可洛克: 如果一个人从生下来就没有学过语言,也没有接触过文字。那么他会以什么样的方式想事情呢。看到天很蓝既不会想“天气真好(因为没有好这个词的概念)”也不会想“天真蓝(因为没有蓝这个词的概念)”,到底会想什么呢

Lake桑

每日一词:chapel(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 18, 2018 is:

chapel • \CHAP-ul\  • noun

1 : a subordinate or private place of worship

2 : a place of worship used by a Christian group other than an established church

3 : a choir of singers belonging to a chapel

4 : a chapel service or assembly at a school or college

Examples:

The school required all of its students to attend chapel daily.

“The monastery contains a chapel, 26 bedrooms, a kitchen, a dining room, meeting rooms, offices, a library and a gift shop.” — Thomas Saccente, The Times Record (Fort Smith, Arkansas), 8 Oct. 2018

Did you know?

Chapel is ultimately derived from the Late Latin word cappa, meaning “cloak.” How did we get from a garment to a building? The answer to this question has to do with a shrine created to hold the sacred cloak of St. Martin of Tours. In Medieval Latin, this shrine was called cappella (from a diminutive of cappa, meaning “short cloak or cape”) in reference to the relic it contained. Later, the meaning of cappella broadened to include any building that housed a sacred relic, and eventually to a place of worship. Anglo-French picked up the term as chapele, which in turn passed into English as chapel in the 13th century. In case you are wondering, the term a cappella, meaning “without instrumental accompaniment,” entered English from Italian, where it literally means “in chapel style.”


Lake桑

November 18, 2018 at 01:00PM

我的微博:我吹爆笛子姥爷(来自 Lake桑的微博)

原文链接
我吹爆笛子姥爷

转发 @笛子Ocarina: 小绿和小蓝 带给大家机器人篇《发布会》的下篇!我这两天超努力,大家也终于可以连起来一起看啦-v-

上篇在这里,没看过的请务必先看上篇→ 网页链接

【想看《小绿和小蓝》全部漫画的朋友可以看我的微博置顶】

Lake桑

我的微博:#小绿和小蓝# 带给大家久违的机器人篇(转发自 笛子Ocarina的微博)

原文链接
Repost

转发 @笛子Ocarina: #小绿和小蓝[超话]# 带给大家久违的机器人篇!这次的故事很长,讲的是开发部的内部发布会-v-

但这次虽然量很多,内容却——未完待续!天哪机器人篇也终于分上下集了吗 Σ(゚Д゚|||) 其实我是想一次画完来着,但篇幅比预计的长,只好委屈大家多等等了_( :3 」∠)_ 下集我会尽快画出来的。

【想看《小绿和小蓝》全部漫画的朋友可以看我的微博置顶】

Lake桑

我的微博:哈哈哈哈哈哈哈哈哈哈哈哈哈哈哈(来自 Lake桑的微博)

原文链接
哈哈哈哈哈哈哈哈哈哈哈哈哈哈哈

转发 @程序员小蓝: …..???

Lake桑

每日一词:susurrous(转自 韦氏词典)

原文链接


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 17, 2018 is:

susurrous • \soo-SUR-us\  • adjective

: full of whispering sounds

Examples:

As the vacationers slept, the only sound was the susurrous breeze blowing through the curtains of the open window.

“Silence, more anticipatory than uncomfortable, replaced the susurrous swirl of conversation, that tentative tête-à-tête among those who may or may not be acquainted but have a certain thing in common.” — Sam McManis, SFGate.com, 9 Mar. 2015

Did you know?

Susurrous derives from the Latin noun susurrus, meaning “a hum” or “a whisper,” and may be a distant relative of swarm (think of the collective hum of a beehive). Susurrus is itself an English noun with the meaning “a whispering or rustling sound” (Stephen King provides us with the example of “a violent susurrus of air”). Both the noun and the adjective (note that the two are spelled differently) are products of the 19th century, but they were preceded by the noun susurration, which in the 15th century originally meant “malicious whispering or rumor.” Today susurrous is used to describe any kind of sound that resembles a whisper: a light breeze through a tree, perhaps, or the murmurs of intrigued theatergoers.


Lake桑

November 17, 2018 at 01:00PM

Minecraft 越来越 RPG 化了。

村庄和掠夺(Village and Pillage)Java版1.14版本的名称,也是基岩版1.8版本的名称,它是即将更新的主版本,未确定发布日期。[1]

摘自 Minecraft Wiki

村庄与掠夺,一看上去就是 RPG 题材的东西。

    • 比弓拥有更高的伤害,但需要更长的时间拉弦蓄力。
    • 可以附上新的附魔:
      • 多重射击
        • 一次发射三支不同方向的
      • 快速填充
        • 拉弦蓄力速度加快。
      • 贯穿
        • 发射的箭会穿透生物。
    • 当主手上拿着弩,副手上拿着烟花火箭时,可以发射烟花火箭
    • 可以合成。
  • 浆果
    • 一种食物
    • 由灌木丛林产出。
摘自 Minecraft Wiki

弩,典型的 RPG 游戏中会出现的武器。与其他 RPG 游戏不同的是,Minecraft 中的弓的伤害比近战伤害似乎会高一点。

再说的话,就是这次更新加入的方块太多装饰性方块了,几乎就是越来越 RPG 了,风格开始有所偏向性了。

怎么说呢,不是说不好,而是有些让人意外。虽然也是意料之中。

Lake桑

2018.11.17 

我的微博:当一切都开始压迫你,但是一切的外在表现也没变时,自(来自 Lake桑的微博)

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当一切都开始压迫你,但是一切的外在表现也没变时,自己需要保持一样的微笑,成了一种莫名的责任。
对自己的人生负责本来就是自己的义务。
而当你发现做到这个之后你依然不知道怎么为社会负责时,你早就累了。
希望自己夜间的胡言乱语别那么让人看不透。。看到请让我改成自己可见。

Lake桑

我的微博:又来借小号吐槽。我能接受人负能…(来自 Lake桑的微博)

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但是自己什么都不会即使给了建设性批评也会被喷吧的想法就会不自觉的开始散播负能了呢。

转发 @一凡ichibon: 又来借小号吐槽。
我能接受人负能,但我不能接受那种烂泥扶不上墙类型的负能。
像那种“反正我就是怎样怎样”,“大佬就是大佬”,“大佬跟我们不一样”。以及反复反复反复强调别人是大佬自己是渣的人。那种看到别人一丁半点比自己强就高呼对方是神仙的人。那种无时不刻不再强调自己要画画写文了结果什么都没在做的人。
尽可能的远离这类人,因为一点都不想被这种负面信息影响…

Lake桑

我的微博:可以笑一天系列(来自 Lake桑的微博)

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可以笑一天系列

转发 @stage1st宅社区: 电视台里的泥石流

Lake桑

我的微博:转发微博(来自 Lake桑的微博)

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转发微博

转发 @南京美食: 转发这张图片你将在一个星期内受到一笔巨款!

Lake桑